Double dragon on worldpillar

– Hittite, seal,two headed eagle, Boğazköy, 1800 BC, Museum of Anatolian

– Mayan double headed dragon. Goal at ball game court Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Mayan Riviera Yucatan Peninsula Mexico . Source http://www.athenasweb.com/1999/columns/Column112699.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaru_(mythology)

 

Detail of a brocaded double headed bird on a Maya textile A woven cloth from San Pedro Sacatepequez Guatemala

the double-headed eagle was known under a variety of names among ancient civilizations. The Hittites called it Teshup. In ancient India the bird was called Garuda. The Seliuk Turks referred to it as Hamca and among the Zuni it appeared as a highly conventionalized design, but still as a double-headed thunder bird, the Sikyatki.

 

Mushushu and Ningizzida neobabylonian 626 BC and ended in 539 BC

Ningishzida (sum: dnin-g̃iš-zid-da) is a Mesopotamian deity of vegetation and the underworld. Thorkild Jacobsen translates Ningishzida as Sumerian for “lord of the good tree”.[1]

Some accounts suggest that the oldest known imagery of the caduceus have their roots in a Mesopotamian origin with the Sumerian god Ningishzida whose symbol, a staff with two snakes intertwined around it, dates back to 4000 B.C. to 3000 B.C.[Gary Lachman, “The Quest for Hermes Trismigestus”, 2011, Chapter 3, p. x.]

Libation Vase of the God Ningishzida

AO 190

Neo-Sumerian era, around 2120 BC.

Telloh, Ancient Girsu

Chlorite

Richelieu room 2

The overall composition of this ritual vase
evokes the regenerative power of nature,
of which this god is the driving force.

In front of two winged reptiles,
demi-gods with their horned tiaras
are two upward spiraling serpents.
This is an image of vital power which is also
reminiscent of the Greek caduceus.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu%C5%A1%E1%B8%ABu%C5%A1%C5%A1u

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ningishzida

Sirrush.jpg

He also noted that the sirrush is shown on the Ishtar Gate alongside real animals, the lion and the rimi (aurochs)

 

Image result for oldest depiction of Mušḫuššu

Gilgamesh seal, the tale of Gilgamesh with super-human strength

http://www.worldglobetrotters.com/Links/Caduceus/caduceus.htm

 

Shatapatha Brahmana

 

yasya pucchāgre ’vākśirasaḥ kuṇḍalī-bhūta-dehasya dhruva upakalpitas tasya lāṅgūle prajāpatir agnir indro dharma iti puccha-mūle dhātā vidhātā ca kaṭyāṁ saptarṣayaḥ; tasya dakṣiṇāvarta-kuṇḍalī-bhūta-śarīrasya yāny udagayanāni dakṣiṇa-pārśve tu nakṣatrāṇy upakalpayanti dakṣiṇāyanāni tu savye; yathā śiśumārasya kuṇḍalā-bhoga-sanniveśasya pārśvayor ubhayor apy avayavāḥ samasaṅkhyā bhavanti; pṛṣṭhe tv ajavīthī ākāśa-gaṅgā codarataḥ.

SYNONYMS

yasya—of which; pucchaagre—at the end of the tail; avākśirasaḥ—whose head is downward; kuṇḍalībhūtadehasya—whose body, which is coiled; dhruvaḥMahārāja Dhruva on his planet, the polestar; upakalpitaḥ—is situated; tasya—of that; lāṅgūle—on the tail; prajāpatiḥ—of the name Prajāpati; agniḥAgni; indraḥIndra; dharmaḥDharma; iti—thus; pucchamūle—at the base of the tail; dhātā vidhātā—the demigods known as Dhātā and Vidhātā; ca—also; kaṭyām—on the hip; saptaṛṣayaḥ—the seven saintly sages; tasya—of that; dakṣiṇaāvartakuṇḍalībhūtaśarīrasya—whose body is like a coil turning toward the right side; yāni—which; udagayanāni—marking the northern courses; dakṣiṇapārśve—on the right side; tu—but; nakṣatrāṇi—constellations; upakalpayanti—are situated; dakṣiṇaāyanāni—the fourteen stars, from Puṣyā to Uttarāṣāḍhā, marking the northern course; tu—but; savye—on the left side; yathā—just like; śiśumārasya—of the dolphin; kuṇḍalābhogasanniveśasya—whose body appears like a coil; pārśvayoḥ—on the sides; ubhayoḥ—both; api—certainly; avayavāḥ—the limbs; samasaṅkhyāḥ—of equal number (fourteen); bhavanti—are; pṛṣṭhe—on the back; tu—of course; ajavīthī—the first three stars marking the southern route (Mūlā, Pūrvaṣāḍhā and Uttarāṣāḍhā); ākāśagaṅgā—the Ganges in the sky (the Milky Way); ca—also; udarataḥ—on the abdomen.

TRANSLATION

This form of the śiśumāra has its head downward and its body coiled. On the end of its tail is the planet of Dhruva, on the body of its tail are the planets of the demigods Prajāpati, Agni, Indra and Dharma, and at the base of its tail are the planets of the demigods Dhātā and Vidhātā. Where the hips might be on the śiśumāra are the seven saintly sages like Vasiṣṭha and Aṅgirā. The coiled body of the Śiśumāra-cakra turns toward its right side, on which the fourteen constellations from Abhijit to Punarvasu are located. On its left side are the fourteen stars from Puṣyā to Uttarāṣāḍhā. Thus its body is balanced because its sides are occupied by an equal number of stars. On the back of the śiśumāra is the group of stars known as Ajavīthī, and on its abdomen is the Ganges that flows in the sky [the Milky Way].

Link to this page: https://prabhupadabooks.com/sb/5/23/5

 

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The Shatapatha Brahmana of Madhyandina School was translated into English by Julius Eggeling, in the late 19th century, in 5 volumes published as part of the Sacred Books of the East series.

The English translation of Kanva School was done by W.E. Caland in 3 parts.

It also adresses the floodmyth of MANU (pre noah)

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https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=Julius+Eggeling&tn=&kn=&isbn=

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=&tn=the+sacred+books+of+the+east&kn=&isbn=

Translation /interpretation by Stijn van den Hoven:

The sacred Hindu text Shatpatha Brhamana mentions an idea of a mythical planetary system called Shishumara. It is described as “having its head downward and its body coiled. On the end of its tail is the planet of Dhruva (polestar at little dipper),

On the body of its tail are the planets of demigods Prajapati(uranus) Agni (sun), Indra(jupiter) and Dharma, [??] and at the base of its tail are the planets of the demigods Dhata (Mars?) and Vidhata.[Venus?]

Where the hips might be on the Shishumara are the seven saintly sages like Vasinora and Aigira.(big dipper?)

The coiled body of the Shishumar-cakra turns toward its right side, on which the fourteen constellations from Abhijit(lyra/vega) to Punarvasu(gemini) are located. On its left side are the fourteen stars from Punya (?) to Uttaranoaha.(?) Thus its body is balanced because its sides are occupied by an equal number of stars. (28 lunar mansions)

On the back of the Shishumara is a group of stars known as the Ajavethe [??], and on its abdomen is the Ganges that flows into the sky [the Milky Way].”

The Sacred Books of the East Series  – Julius Eggeling