h20

“I had an HHO on my 99.5 Jetta TDI, with the right electrolyte……………..simple baking soda was fine………….the thing had more bubbles than the Canadian Real Estate market.”

Water electrolysis requires either:

a: high voltage(that can be done with pure water)
b. Low voltage with added electrolyte. (example baking soda)

  1. no sodium was added to the water
  2. two cylinders need a 3.8inch gap
  3. bubbler and backfire arrestor

Hydrogen is produced in double the amount of oxygen. With modified machinery one can cook and run a generator on this.

Mike kalogerakis, village outside of heraklion of krete managed to seperate oxygen and hydrogen using a special shaped hydrogenerator without the need of expensive filters.

 

Scientists have invented the strongest and lightest material on Earth

Note: diamonds are so hard due to their geometric triangular arrangement on a molecular level.

For years, researchers have known that carbon, when arranged in a certain way, can be very strong. Case in point: graphene. Graphene, which was heretofore, the strongest material known to man, is made from an extremely thin sheet of carbon atoms arranged in two dimensions.

But there’s one drawback: while notable for its thinness and unique electrical properties, it’s very difficult to create useful, three-dimensional materials out of graphene.

Now, a team of MIT researchers discovered that taking small flakes of graphene and fusing them following a mesh-like structure not only retains the material’s strength, but the graphene also remains porous.

Based on experiments conducted on 3D printed models, researchers have determined that this new material, with its distinct geometry, is actually stronger than graphene – making it 10 times stronger than steel, with only 5 percent of its density.

The discovery of a material that is extremely strong but exceptionally lightweight will have numerous applications.

As MIT reports:

“The new findings show that the crucial aspect of the new 3-D forms has more to do with their unusual geometrical configuration than with the material itself, which suggests that similar strong, lightweight materials could be made from a variety of materials by creating similar geometric features.”

Below you can see a simulation results of compression (top left and i) and tensile (bottom left and ii) tests on 3D graphene:

Credit: Zhao Qin

“You could either use the real graphene material or use the geometry we discovered with other materials, like polymers or metals,” says Markus Buehler, head of MIT’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), and the McAfee Professor of Engineering.

“You can replace the material itself with anything. The geometry is the dominant factor. It’s something that has the potential to transfer to many things.”

Large scale structural projects, such as bridges, can follow the geometry to ensure that the structure is strong and sound.

Construction may prove to be easier, given that the material used will now be significantly lighter. Because of its porous nature, it may also be applied to filtration systems.

This research, says Huajian Gao, a professor of engineering at Brown University, who was not involved in this work, “shows a promising direction of bringing the strength of 2D materials and the power of material architecture design together”.

 

Sources: http://www.sciencealert.com/mit-has-unveiled-new-material-that-s-the-strongest-and-lightest-on-earth?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Branded%2520Content&utm_campaign=ScienceDump

This article was originally published by Futurism. Read the original article.

Rock cut caves and temples in india

Elora Caves / Kailasa Temple

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellora_Caves

Ajanta Caves

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajanta_Caves

 

Elephanta Caves
Gharapuri, India

GRID COORDINATES: WGS84; 18° 57′ 30″ N, 72° 55′ 50″ E
Or: 18.958333, 72.930556
Elephanta Caves:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephanta_Caves
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/244
Videos:
Elephanta Caves – India:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCcSYOowrxg

This resembles rock crafted art like Lalibella churches in Ethiopia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lalibela

Stone softening

Legends also tell of how the edges of the stones would be rubbed with the juice of a special plant which would soften the stone like clay and thus perfect the joint. To think that simply because we have not yet located the small crimson plant Fawcett spoke of in the myriad of unknown species that have yet to be discovered in the Amazon jungle certainly does not mean that such a plant does not exist. To rule something out completely because it has been found yet would be nothing short of foolhardy, with such an attitude we would never have
discovered electricity, that’s a given. One of the more unfortunate things in the dilemma though, is that time is fast running out. We
may now never find any such plant. Not now that the main Amazon basin has been ruined by American oil interests and the remaining forests are still being destroyed at the rate of at least 3 football fields a day. It’s almost like they’re trying to make sure all evidence of such a thing is destroyed. But then, one should never attribute an action to malice when it can be adequately explained by stupidity. Though, when one is considering the actions, motives and attitudes of
modern governments, unfortunately it’s usually the former. Such a plant may have already become a victim of industry, lost forever in the technological crunch.

Herb to soften stone (Evidence of stone softening in India)

This video was translated by the Kannada institute by request of myself Stijn van den Hoven. It is same story as Peru, that there was a liquid, plant to soften rocks. In My makara research paper I made links between india and peru so am not surprised this was known on both continents and thus how they could build such exquisite temple carvings and structures.

Karnataka state – Hangal
Shripad S Akkivalli – from the horticulture department

Shripad mentions that these stones are sculpted as though it were wax. He says that there are many theories to how stones were shaped. One theory he heard from his father about a plant which softened stone.  Shripad believes that a plant exists or existed which sculptors of ancient India used to soften stones so that they could create works of art which we
see today in thousands of temples.

Literal translation whats is said in video : (Local kannada language)

“One day when his father was crossing a river with few people, suddenly a person appears. He brings the herbs from a field and scrubs on rough surfaced stone that his father and other people are carrying.

As the person who bought herb scrubs on the stone, it becomes smooth, soft and shining. So his father enquirer about the herb, it’s name and where it is grown but the man did not reveal the information.”

So the jist of story is that there are herbs which softens the stone.

 

 

 

http://karnatakatravel.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/hangal-fort-and-billeshwara-temple.html

http://journeys-temple.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/hangal-fort-and-billeshwara-temple.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangal
http://www.hanagaltown.mrc.gov.in/node/187
http://journeys-temple.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/hangal-fort-and-billeshwara-temple.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangal
http://www.hanagaltown.mrc.gov.in/node/187

Stone spheres of Costa Rica (Garbo, stone softening)

There the potion pops up again. Stones made from Garbo. I believe thats 4-5 on hardness scale. Some local legends state that the native inhabitants had access to a potion able to soften the rock. Research led by Joseph Davidovits of the Geopolymer Institute in France has been offered in support of this hypothesis, but it is not supported by geological or archaeological evidence (No one has been able to demonstrate that gabbro, the material from which most of the balls are sculpted, can be worked this way.)
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_spheres_of_Costa_Rica

Stone Softening + partly translated article

 

There is a legend widespread among many of the pre-Columbian peoples, according to which the gods had given a gift to the native Indians so they could build colossal architectural masterpieces such as the Sacsayhuaman fortress or the complex of Machu Picchu.

According to Lira priest, that this was nothing more than two plants with amazing properties: Coca leaf, able to numb the pain and the exhaustion of workers, so they could withstand the huge physical effort so extraordinary constructions demanded them. The other plant was one that mixed with various components, convert the hardest rocks into easily manageable folders.

For fourteen years Lira priest studied the legend of the ancient Andean people and finally was able to identify the bush “Jotcha” [is no question that is the Andean Ephedra) as the plant that once mixed and treated with other vegetables and certain substances, was able to convert the hardest stone in pure clay.

“The ancient Indians dominated the mass of technical – says the priest Lira in one of his articles – softening the stone reduced to a soft dough, could shape easily.”

The priest conducted several experiments with bush Jotcha and even get a rock solid soften up almost liquefy themselves. However, he could no longer make it hard, so consider his experiment as a failure. However, despite this partial failure, Father Lira was able to demonstrate that the rocks softening technique is possible. Thus the amazing slots of some of the colossal rocks that make up the walls of Sacsayhuaman or other pre-Columbian fortresses would be explained.

While in Egypt, thousands of kilometers away, other researchers performed amazing archaeological discoveries that also point to the reality of the technique of softening the rocks …

 

5. The Andean Ephedra, a plant osprey

Aukanaw, in his text devoted to bird enigma Pitiwe and grass which dissolves the iron and stone, reminds us of the existence of a medicinal plant by the Mapuche-considered growing in the Andean highlands, from Ecuador to the Strait of Magellan . Botanists call Ephedra Andean, and one of those suspected of being the famous and much sought after herb of the Incas.

Not surprisingly, by instinct, animals avoid it, because we have seen what happens when ingested: it is known of small mammals such as foxes and guinea pigs who have succumbed to their bloated bodies and debris bones juices from branches and leaves.

 

The Mapuche shamans much appreciated for its medicinal properties and as a ritual item. In Argentina, also known as:

solupe, Sulupe, Punco Punco, Solder Soldering, Ponytail, Tramontana, Trasmontana, Pico de gallo or Pinko-pinko. In Peru receives almost the same names that have given the Mapuche in Patagonia, along with other native: Q’ero-q’ero, Ponytail, Condorsava, Likchanga, Pachatara, Pfinco-pfinco, Pinco-pinco, Pingo- Pingo, Weld with welding, Weld-welded, Wacua …

En Argentina la conocen también como Solupe, Sulupe, Punco punco, Suelda que suelda, Cola de caballo, Tramontana, Trasmontana, Pico de gallo o Pinko-pinko. En Perú recibe casi las mismas denominaciones que le han dado los mapuche de la Patagonia, además de otras autóctonas: Q’ero-q’ero, Cola de caballo, Condorsava, Likchanga, Pachatara, Pfinco-pfinco, Pinco-pinco, Pingo-pingo, Suelda con suelda, Suelda-suelda, Wacua

It is a shrub densely branched junciformes branches up to 40 cm; sometimes stalk the stands, other bows; whorled branches. Escamiformes leaves in whorls at the nodes. The flowers are whorled, dioecious, inconspicuous: the female little protected by bracts overlapping with globosa seminiferous scale; male with 6 stamens. The seed is arylated, “pseudobaya” which resembles a once dry nucule.


 Other person: That plant is the coconut tree water and its wood

Making stone from sand?

Two stories:

”Of course, the thing that got me most interested in him was, well, he was going up a valley, the Parahyva Valley in southern Peru, on the Amazonian side. He came to a granite cliff in a gorge. This cliff was absolutely upright, like a wall, and then there were these perfect little round holes all over it. As he came down the trail he saw little birds that went in and out of these holes. So he said to the people, “What’s that?” and they said, “Well, they nest in those holes.” He said, “How very convenient that there should be all these little holes all ready for the little birds to nest in!” The Amerindians then said to him, “Oh no. They make the holes.”Fawcett answered with, “But that’s granite! How can a little tiny bird, about the size of a warbler, make a hole in solid granite?” They said, “Well, sit down sir, and watch!” And sure enough, the birds began coming with little pieces of a red leaf in their bill. We have now found out what the plant is, what the leaf is, and it’s quite well known. It’s a very common plant. As a matter of fact, we use it for ornamental purposes. You can buy it in the stores, in a florist’s in New York. The Latin name escapes me, but its got ordinary sort of rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple instead of being green. It has a substance in it that is a very strong alkali and not an acid.The birds would go and take pieces of these leaves and then they would hang on the cliff with their little claws, like a bat, and they’d rub this leaf onto the rock. Then they would fly away and get another one. They would work on this all day. Then in the evening when the sun went down; with their little soft bills they’d peck, peck, peck, and all the rock would be dissolved by the juice out of this plant in combination with their saliva. As they picked at it, it would all turn to something like sand and crumble away. Working three or four days, they could make a perfect spherical hole big enough to get into and lay their eggs.Well, Colonel Fawcett got very interested in this, and he said, “There must be something in this juice which softens stone.” And the Amerindians said, “Oh, of course, sir, how do you think we made all our great big carvings? You don’t think that we carved all those huge stone monuments? Oh no, we softened them with this juice until it was like plastic, plasticine, then we molded our gods and figures, and then we poured cold water on it and set it again, and it turned back to stone.”Fawcett went on with this, and he actually got a pot of this stuff out of an old grave, and it was a long story, but it fell over and broke, and it dissolved the stone under it. It was just like putty, and you could make anything you wanted out of it. Now we’re working back historically and we found that the ancient Hebrews had it in the Near East, and the North American Indians had it, this same process of softening stone rather than chipping it. They could dissolve limestone with it and set it again, making all those fantastic “carvings,” you know? We found out that the process is quite well known, it’s called chelation. It’s well known to all botanists, and it is nothing else but the simple natural process by which the roots of plants dissolve rock. Look out of this window here, I mean we have a picture window here, and all of these trees growing around the house. The way these trees can put their tap roots right down through the soil, into the subsoil, right through that, and maybe into solid rock, is called chelation. The little tiny ends of the soft roots, the very tips, dissolve the stone and soften it. Then they move in, drag all the moisture out and pump it up to make the leaves and everything else. It’s an enormous industry now in this country.
RG: It is?
ITS: Oh sure, it’s all over. There are a couple of corporations experimenting with it, and there are 58 people south of Chicago who are developing chelated products for agriculture and for medicinal purposes, and so on.You see, people don’t realize it’s been lying under our nose all the time, but it was Colonel Fawcett who first found it.
RG: Think of the commercial possibilities. Just spray this stuff on rock, and you could tunnel through mountains, and things like that.”

Aukanaw, an Argentine anthropologist of Mapuche origin, who died in 1994, related a tradition about a species of woodpecker known locally by such names as pitiwe, pite, and pitio; its scientific name is probably Colaptes pitius (Chilean fli…cker), which is found in Chile and Argentina, or Colaptes rupicola (Andean flicker), which is found in southern Ecuador, Peru, western Bolivia, and northern Argentina and Chile. If someone blocks the entrance to its nest with a piece of rock or iron it will fetch a rare plant, known as pito or pitu, and rub it against the obstacle, causing it to become weaker or dissolve.

In Peru, above 4500 m, there is said to be a plant called kechuca which turns stone to jelly, and which the jakkacllopito bird uses to make its nest. A plant with similar properties that grows at even higher altitudes is known, among other things, as punco-punco; this may be Ephedra andina, which the Mapuche consider a medicinal plant.

Elder Gods of Antiquity

By M. Don Schorn

https://books.google.co.za/books?id=NrLq1EBd9jAC&pg=PA278&lpg=PA278&dq=red+leaves+stone+softening+peru&source=bl&ots=ICiTlaX6NE&sig=K_yFD0dMqIBRsbHezxtslMGZSck&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAmoVChMI3cq1hJTRyAIVTL0UCh2l_wFv#v=onepage&q=red%20leaves%20stone%20softening%20peru&f=false

 

book

 

dark red leaves
about a foot high
low to the ground with thick red leaves
rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple

 

There is evidence that in ancient times, both in Peru and Tahiti, a softening procedure for hard rock was in use, enabling it to receive hand or foot imprints by pressure only, as though the granite was putty soft.

How did they do it? Quite possibly from a plant extract! It seems that this process for softening hard rock, by utilizing a radioactive plant extract, may have been used by the Incas and others in shaping stones.

· An earthenware jug discovered in a Peruvian grave contained a black viscous fluid that, when spilled on rocks, turned them into a soft, malleable putty.

· American archaeologist A. Hyatt Verrill saw remnants of this substance in the possession of an Indian witch doctor.

· Fawcett. the British explorer, recorded in his diary that on a walk along the River Perene, in Peru, a pair of large, Mexican-type spurs was corroded to stumps in one day by the juice from a patch of low plants. The plants grew about a foot high and had dark-reddish fleshy leaves. A local rancher commented: “That is the stuff the Incas used for shaping stones.”

· A small, kingfisher-like bird in the Bolivian Andes bores holes in solid rock by rubbing a leaf on the rock until it is soft and can be pecked away. This bird is probably the white-capped dipper (cinclus leucocephalus), which nests in spherical holes, on the banks of mountain streams.

It appears that ancient races discovered and used this fascinating secret – something that modern science has not yet learned to apply.

 

Gary Webb of South Weston, New South Wales, Australia, wrote to me recently:

“While working with two Greek bricklayers in the Blue Mountains, they told me a story of someone from their family.”The story goes that they were helping to excavate an archaeological site when they came across a type of glass container with liquid inside.They opened it up and poured the liquid out onto a rock, which caused a hole to go straight through the rock.”This happened somewhere in Greece (near Athens, I think, but I’m not sure).”

 

Ability to slice through hardest materials without friction or heat

Talmudic-Midrashic traditions speak of a most unusual building tool, called Shamir, that was used in the construction of the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem. This device was capable of cutting the toughest materials “without friction or heat”, was reportedly “noiseless”, and could slice through diamonds.

Special precautions surrounded its use: “The Shamir may not be put in an iron vessel for safekeeping, nor in any metal vessel; it would burst such a receptacle asunder. It is to be kept wrapped up in a woollen cloth and this in turn is to be placed in a lead basket filled with barley bran.”

The Shamir was best known by its function as “the stone that cuts rocks”, although it was often also referred to as a “worm” or a “serpent”.

Judaic tradition directly associates the Shamir with Moses.

Very little is known about the Shamir except that the name means “worm” and also something like “starer”. Things like stone could be cut in extremely precise ways by “showing them” to the Shamir. When not in use, the Shamir had to be stored buried in rice inside a closed lead container. Anything other container would burst under the “Worm’s stare” and let it loose. When Solomon wanted to build the Temple, he knew of the Shamir but not where to find it. He commissioned a search of the whole world, which turned up “an amount of Shamir the size of a barleycorn” (about 1 cm² or maybe 1 ml) which makes it possible the Shamir was actually a substance rather than an actual worm. That amount was enough for Solomon to build the Temple, but it was either used up or else it had lost its potency and disappeared by the time of the Babylonian Exile. Like the Ark of the Covenant, it just basically disappeared from history.

 

It actually can be done with a special liquid made from certain plants
which are quite common. I’ve been doing it since I was a child to make clay
on site to make toys and figurines.

vinegar
sea water
lemon juice
ideally the juice from pineapple or durong fruit

Combine amounts to see which one works and give it a try

June 2003, No. 46

Section Contents:

On June and facts (Benjamin Hernandez Blazquez)
The stones of clay (Carlos Gamero Esparza)

INTRODUCTION
1. The parent Jotcha Lira

1.2. The “People of the Earth”

1.2.1. The wonderful plant
2. On the trail of stones softeners

2.1. Fawcett 1 Exploring
2.2. Exploration Fawcett 2
3. Those strange stones …
4. Colaptes Colaptes rupicola or pitius?

4.1. Two birds and a mystery
4.2. Rara avis …
5. The Andean Ephedra, a plant osprey
6. The enigma of Collao

6.1. The metropolis of Lost Time
6.2. “Rivets” prehispanic
7. Other hypotheses: the Egyptian question

7.1. The god Khnum teaches chemistry
8. Find out more …
9. Did you know that …
10. Epilogue: Two views …

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban the Incas their buildings?

10.1.1. The hypothesis of “soft stone”
10.1.2. The “impossible” boundary stones
10.1.3. How the blocks prefabricaban
10.1.4. The construction of the wall
10.2. Inca stones lose their mystery

10.2.1. “The madman of the quarry”
10.2.2. Empire record
10.2.3. Natural Harmony
11. Notes
12. SOURCES
13. List of Images

Back to top Article Back to top

The stones of clay

Carlos Gamero Esparza. EYE Journal. Lima Peru)

An old archaeological puzzle that has scientists head … how did you get people like the ancient Incas cyclopean stone blocks fit in its monumental buildings, with unsurpassed perfection? Were they perhaps artificial, the prefabricaban or … as some legends say, they knew a secret technique to “soften” and accommodate them at will, as if made ​​of clay?

“Hiram Bingham told him about the existence of a plant with the Incas whose juices softened the stones so they could fit perfectly There are records about the plant, including the early Spanish chroniclers After such a version would check.. One day, camping along a rocky river, he observed a bird standing on a rock that had a leaf in its beak, the bird saw the sheet placed on the stone and pecked. The bird returned the next day. By then he had formed a concavity where it was before the sheet. With this method, the bird created a “cup” to catch and drink the water that dotted the river. Considering the fact that the lichen softens the stone to tie the roots underground, and perhaps considering the continued extinction of this plant, this notion is merely improbable. “Richard Nisbet (1)

Contents:

INTRODUCTION
1. The parent Jotcha Lira

1.2. The “People of the Earth”

1.2.1. The wonderful plant
2. On the trail of stones softeners

2.1. Fawcett 1 Exploring
2.2. Exploration Fawcett 2
3. Those strange stones …
4. Colaptes Colaptes rupicola or pitius?

4.1. Two birds and a mystery
4.2. Rara avis …
5. The Andean Ephedra, a plant osprey
6. The enigma of Collao

6.1. The metropolis of Lost Time
6.2. “Rivets” prehispanic
7. Other hypotheses: the Egyptian question

7.1. The god Khnum teaches chemistry
8. Find out more …
9. Did you know that …
10. Epilogue: Two views …

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban the Incas their buildings?

10.1.1. The hypothesis of “soft stone”
10.1.2. The “impossible” boundary stones
10.1.3. How the blocks prefabricaban
10.1.4. The construction of the wall
10.2. Inca stones lose their mystery

10.2.1. “The madman of the quarry”
10.2.2. Empire record
10.2.3. Natural Harmony
11. Notes
12. SOURCES
13. List of Images

INTRODUCTION

The chroniclers of the first half of the sixteenth century were as surprised as captains who carried out the feat of the conquest of Peru. They could not understand how it was that between the joints of the exquisite Inca walls in Cusco could not enter or the edge of a razor. They could not understand how they were set in place the colossal carved stones of Sacsayhuaman, for many military strength, for others a sacred complex, and others … a giant celestial observatory or a riddle … the size of your portent; and left with doubt and perplexity when they entered the Coricancha, the sacred seat of the Inca sun god, where, amazed, not so much for the gold they found his countrymen, but by the perfection of its architectural forms, came to compare the Cusco with Rome or Jerusalem. The stones of the walls appeared to have been welded to each other!

In February 1995 I had the joy of traveling to Cusco, after many years, I finally had that opportunity. My hotel was in the historic city center, near the Plaza de Armas or Plaza Mayor, which the Incas called Huacaypata. Coincidentally, behind the hostel where he was staying, on the Avenida El Sol, he was one of the most emblematic of the ancient capital of the Inca sites, the Church of Santo Domingo. My steps, then took me there until the Coricancha, the mythical Temple of the Sun, whose name in Quechua means “golden fence”, the home of Inti, the principal deity of the Incas. Here the guides explained that Spanish tourists even used dynamite in his attempt to shoot down some stone walls or earthquakes have been able to throw down.

Figure 1.jpg (13795 bytes)

Figure 1. A dawn in the Sun Temple. The rays of the sun slip enhancing the beauty of this sacred place, a corner of the mythical Coricancha.
Lizardo photo Tavera – Argentine Anthropology website.

Despite inclement weather and men, these beautiful paintings of white andesite, blue and red have survived to the shock and amazement of friends and strangers. “Experts do not know how they were raised, but these padded walls seem all in one piece “they explain. And no wonder … the tour guides coax visitors with the grandeur of the empire of the Incas, but can not explain how it was built this temple, like many other monuments of ancient Peru and the world.

Since then, he did not give me the concern about the mystery of Inca stones.

Return to top of section Back to top Article Back to top

1. The parent Jotcha Lira

For centuries the Andean people’s ability to carve stone and building walls capable of resisting forever remained covered by the mists of myth. Science, in its quest to solve the riddle, it went almost head on the Inca walls and traditional archeology, that that does not support considerations that go beyond its narrow dogmas established, he has borne the brunt, not you had better idea to resort to the hackneyed argument that the stones were carved beak, chisel and hammer, because inconceivable that the Peruvian old has known other technology than the bow and arrow.

The Latin American classical archeology was rocked in 1983 when the Spanish network RTVE television documentary aired on The Other Peru, as part of the series issued by the renowned psychiatrist and researcher Jimenez del Oso. In the program he realized one of the greatest enigmas of ancient Peru and in which the author interviewed an unusual character: Father Jorge Lira.

Spanish journalist has Juanjo Perez (2) , the father Lira a late Peruvian priest, was one of the foremost experts in Andean folklore, authored numerous books and articles and, especially, the first dictionary of Quechua to Castilian. He said character lived in a nearby Cusco town and even beyond Jimenez Bear went to interview him about a disturbing statement: the little father claimed to have discovered the best kept secret of the Incas: a plant substance able to soften the stones.

But this story began much earlier. The legends of many Peruvian pre-Columbian peoples claim that the gods had made ​​them two gifts to the natives so that they could raise colossal architectural works such as Sacsayhuaman (3) or Machu Picchu (4) . Such gifts, according to Father Lira would have been, first, the coca leaf, a powerful anesthetic that enabled workers to resist physical pain and exhaustion -that imagine the effort it must have required the construction of similar monumentos- and the second would have been another plant, amazing properties, mixed with various components, it became the hardest rocks in a pasty and malleable substance.

Figure 1a.jpg (26229 bytes)

1a . ¿stones amassed? ¿Moldeadas? Are Carved? What technique? The only certainty is that contemplate this wonderful Inca wall in Cusco raises many questions, as the father was Jorge Lira.
Photo Rutahsa Archaeology portal.

 

Figure 1b.jpg (38509 bytes)

Figure 1b. monumental Enigma . Or the tip of a knife or a pin can penetrate between the joints of these moles of Sacsayhuaman (Cusco). The human figure is dwarfed by a carved cyclopean stones that can weigh hundreds of tons.
Photo Rutahsa Archaeology portal.

“For fourteen years Juanjo Perez writes Father Lira studied the legend of the ancient Andean and finally managed to identify the bush as the plant jotcha after being mixed and processed with other plants and substances, was able to convert clay stone. “The ancient Indians dominated the technique of mass Lira says the father in one of his articles-softening the stone reduced to a soft dough that could shape easily.”

“The priest continues: Perez conducted several experiments with jotcha bush and came to get a rock solid soften up almost liquefied. However, he failed to return to harden, so he considered his experiment as a failure. But despite the partial failure, the father Lira did manage to show that the technique of softening possible. So the assemblies surprising some of the huge rocks that make up the walls of Sacsayhuaman or other pre-Columbian fortresses “would be explained.

Return to top of section Back to top Article Back to top

1.2. “People of the Earth”

But the resonance of the legend of the grass softens the stone seems much stronger rumble, curiously, among indigenous peoples who still live far to the south of Peru. Among the central regions of Argentina and Chile from the Atlantic to the Pacific, it is extending what was once the territory Mapuche (5) , whose last representatives have been confined in remote communities in the Patagonia Argentina and southern Chile where there are still traditions . Mapuche “people still feel the earth “ (6) , che = people mapu = earth, what is meant by the term that identifies them in his native tongue.

Figure 2.jpg (39393 bytes)

2 . People as one . The Mapuche managed to maintain its independence and its ancient culture preserved despite the influence of the West. This photo of a typical Mapuche family in southern Patagonia, was taken in the late nineteenth century.
Mapuche image obtained Aukanawel website.

Among the Mapuche (7) runs a strange legend, this time Pitiwe bird, a bird with curious customs. The portal for disseminating the work of the noted Argentine anthropologist Mapuche, Aukanaw (8) , this author has in its territory inhabited by a woodpecker who keeps a deep secret. “he writes Aukanaw- Secret jealously shares with” renil “(Mapuche scholars and priests): the plant that dissolved the stone and iron” This bird call Mapuche P’chiu, Pitu or Pitiwe;. it is also known by Pythian, Pito or Pitihue (9) . Altiplano Aymaras call Yarakaka and Quechua: Akkakllu. Its scientific name is Colaptus pitius, and classified in the order of fish-like, the Picidae family, which brings together about 30 species in Argentina, 4 in Chile and 2 in Peru, one of them the Andean Flicker, a kind of woodpecker adapted to extreme climates and considered a very poor choice and endangered bird in the huge contingent of this Andean country.

The Pitiwe is a carpenter of a similar size of a pigeon bird, that is, about 30 cm. It has a front, crown and nape gray slate; and sides of your face and throat tawny. Bars brown and yellowish brown mark above his body, while below is a dirty white with brown stripes. The back and abdomen are yellowish and has yellow iris eyes and black tail. It lives in the mountains, forests and bushes; at the foot of wooded hills and some fields, but flees exotic forest trees. Their diet consists of insects that inhabit the indigenous trees and build their nests in hollow trees. “Examine the log Aukanaw- writes, gives several pecks putting the ear to feel the movements of the hidden bugs and if deemed appropriate swooping on its prey.”

Figure 2a.gif (6497 bytes)

2a . Allegory Pitiwe Mapuche of a bird.
Illustration Aukanawel portal.

“It is a climbing bird that nests continues the author from the Huasco Valley to the Pacific Llanquihue, Argentina and the Andean Patagonian region Mapuche Your name, names derived creole comes from high beep emitted. This Mapuche beep sounds heard clearly as:

Pitiwe! Pitiwe!
or
Pitiu-Pitiu!

In September, when the mating season, several males court one female. No struggle, but they open the fantail and wander contorneándose, ruffling feathers in black crown of the neck. The female chooses its preferred a cuddle, and others go in search of better luck. “Formerly in Chile continues: Aukanaw-, Creole scarecrows boys hired to not let these birds roost in the fields, especially when the Wheat was new, although the Mapuche gladly appreciate your flesh. “

This bird feeds not only the most incredible legends and magical fantasies, but omens and superstitions, such as ensuring that if a Pitiwe stands on a tree and sings for three or four days, it is considered announcement of death for patients a neighboring house. In Cantín-Chiloe, another superstition says that when he cries near a house, announced visit of a person who comes first. In Chile Pitiwe it called “small and skinny children, and” apitihuado “is to feel with a heavy heart, dejected” -apunta Aukanaw.

“Among the williche of San Juan de la Costa says Viviana -we Lemui- when Pitiwe comes flying from far away and comes to rest in a house. It is a sign from far away visit people also said that, when one arrives Suddenly visit are amazed and say:

“Why not send your Pitiwe?”

When it comes to mourn Pitiwe near a house is a sign that the family will die soon, likewise, when the Pitiwe goes crying in the night, in front of a house, soon to die a member of the family.

In the Mapuche medicine and Creole popular figure as a remedy their language. This body is effective to speak the buses early and clearly, and that end is given to roast languages ​​(Cantín). Also Pitiwe broth is used as galactogogue (increases lactation in mothers). “

Return to top of section Back to top Article Back to top

1.2.1. The wonderful plant

The Mapuche say the Pitiwe is a very smart bird but also very discreet about his relationship with some grass that only he knows and whose properties have puzzled archeology long. In Talagante (southern Argentina) runs flown that if a stone obstructs an Pitiwe him entry to its nest, which has built into the trunk of a tree or a hole in a rock face, you go looking for a grass and rubbed her dissolving the stone and destroy the plant juices.

“Diego de Rosales Aukanaw- ‘says in his book:” General History of the Kingdom of Chile “describing medicinal plants Mapuche speaks of an herb called Pito which is the rarest found throughout the world and has great medicinal value . He says that this plant, small in size and growing close to the ground, named after a bird called the Mapuche Pito because eating plant. The Spaniards gave the name Woodpecker. The plant spray dissolves iron.

“Some prisoners have used this property of the plant to flee the prison.

“There are other woodpeckers, which they call: Pito, the body of a thrush: they are painted black, white and burilado and they called yerba del Pitu was referred to the grass, because they use more of it than the other birds.

“They have such a strong peak, breaking, and scuttling any tree, so to take and eat the worms, which are bred in his gut, like to build their nests, opening a concavity in staying with his family.

“They have become famous for the grass, found that natural instinct, that it be broken, and the iron flakes, that there have been many experiences and knowledge acquired with remarkable skill.

“For warning when they take their young and eating out to find them, they close them with an iron door nest those who want to experience the virtue of yerba del Pito, and reaching the woodpecker, and finding the nest closed and their chicks chirp inside and can not get in, and immediately scrambles to find the grass, which they call: pitu, and rubbing her plate, the break, and rolled like paper, which is the rare virtues of herbs known and wonderful instinct of this bird. “

Figure 3.gif (9637 bytes)

Figure 3. Father Diego de Rosales.
Chilean portal Icarito illustration.

Oreste Plath (10) in his classic book “The Language of Birds Chilean” notes the following:

“Botanical analyze the plant kechuca (Note 1) , which produces a juice that makes gelatin stones. abounds there in Peru, Cuzco, above 4,500 meters. “

“A drawing on a huaco continues: Aukanaw-, that is, the repetition of a twig plotted in clay pitchers led the anthropologist to discover that the kechuca was jakkacllopito branch carrying the bird, which nests in small hollows rocks and gives shape to its nest with this herb, which heat the body produce a secretion that is strong excavator to . (Note 2)

And there is another plant called the punco-punco, (Pinko-pinko [Ephedra Andean] ?. Note Aukanaw ) (Note 3) to which the power to dissolve stones, which grows above 5000 meters is also credited. It looks like the reed. Animals that eat it or confuse it with the reed to swell and soften your bones to become an amorphous mass.

Anthropology tell if the great temples of the empire, its giant stones were smoothed with these pastes or juices that allowed assemblies and adjustments; and researchers of botany and medicine which reducing employment report, smelter, will the future drug. “

“Let us note other interesting references:

There are in Bolivia, the museum (Archaeology – N. VA) of Cochabamba, “mingled stones”. That is, generally granitic rocks, which the Incas could, by compression, print the imprint of his hands or his feet, as if the granite had been as soft as butter . (11)

Such impressions are in the rocky mountains of Peru and Tahiti where, according to tradition, the god Hiro, had placed his foot.

In the Mapuche tradition and sacred Mareupuantü werken (messengers) they have left their footprints on the stone in many places, for example in the “Holy Stone” (setting purple, dept Norkin, neuken.); in the river valley of Uco (Mendoza), etc., etc. (…)

Another phenomenon in correlation with the precedent is of huge stone blocks that form the walls of the fortified city of the Incas, mainly Saksawaman near Cuzco.

These blocks are so wisely carved and fitted together, sometimes with beads, which are assembled exactly one another, which suggests that the builders did not carved stone, but chemically treated so that it can then kneaded like clay.

In June 1967 it was known that a Peruvian Catholic priest (see Chapter 1), Jorge Lira, had discovered the procedure of the Incas, which consisted of a grass juice can turn that hard material malleable substance at will.

Lira had conducted successful experiments in the extracted stones macerating liquid from the wonderful plant, plant from which the name is not yet known.

In Paris some years ago ago he resided one pathological liar, or phony, called Beltran Garcia who used the pseudonym “Gregori B.” and claimed to be a descendant of Garcilaso de la Vega and lead the “Sol Inca religion.” This guy happens to be the possessor of the secret of the plant, but with three varieties of vegetables.

They are exciting applications that used the old Mapuche give this little plant, and especially for its medicinal purposes. The ability to temporarily soften the bone matter, has unsuspected possibilities in the treatment of fractures very common, especially cranial, in pre-Columbian fighting.

A mystery unfolds longer mystery and therefore loses its charm, we said too …

These secrets are friends simple yet spirits are elusive to modern minds complicated.

So friend if you want to know more about this herb, and if your ears are ready to hear the voice of the Nuke Mapu (Mother Earth), please ask your guardian, the wise bird Pitiwe, and he knows answer with his usual clarity:

Pitiwe! Pitiwe! “

And bunting, red … the story is over …

Return to top of section Back to top Article Back to top

2. On the trail of stones softeners

On the heights of Peru, tanning farmers for generations speak of a mysterious herb native to this country (Note 4) and a bird they call Pito. While ornithologists have identified a woodpecker receiving such denomination does not only in Peru but also in Bolivia and Chile, botanists have not had the same luck with this enigmatic plant, hitherto unknown to science.

But the men of the Peruvian Andes insist that there is a herb branches and red flowers growing among Puna (5) and the eastern jungles and was used by the Incas to soften the stones. According to them, their ancestors, great observers of nature, they discovered that the bird called Pito used “grass Pitu” to prepare their nests on rock faces, whose sap “melted” the stones and into round holes in the high forest ( Note 5) .

Figure 4.jpg (10080 bytes)

Figure 4 . The highlands in Puno. A typical landscape of the high Andean region. This photo was taken by a Swedish tourist who visited Peru.
Photo obtained from personal Web Hot.ee (Sweden).

 

Figure 5.jpg (29355 bytes)

Figure 5 . In this map of Peru can appreciate the call Puna, high the vast territory that crosses the country from north to south.
Illustration of The National Museum of Natural History (Washington).

Return to top of section Back to top Article Back to top

2.1. Fawcett 1 Exploring

In 1954, Brian Fawcett (12) , youngest son of famous British Colonel Percy H. Fawcett (1867-1925), decided to publish a work of his illustrious father, who was lost without a trace in the jungles of Mato Grosso (Brazil) when I was looking for El Dorado. Colonel Fawcett became famous in the early twentieth century for his expeditions to remote regions of South America, where traveled constantly, obsessed by the golden legends of the Incas, as Paititi, the mythical lost city that could never reach but I was sure existed.

As a result of these Amazonian journeys, Fawcett founded the National Geographic Royal Society of London, today a prestigious international organization of geographical research and scientific dissemination, and published hundreds of articles and books travel adventures outlined by unexplored land. Among these, his last work, Exploration Fawcett, with stories, until then unpublished, plus comments and testimonials about scientific explorations in South America, a fascinating content that became a true “best seller” during the 50s 60.

Figure 6.jpg (5576 bytes)

6 . Home of the book where Percy H. Fawcett recounts his adventures by South American soil, in one of his many reissues. At the top you can see a portrait of the author with his military beanie.
Hall illustration American History.

In this book, Percy Fawcett makes a detailed memorial of his adventures in the most remote jungles of the world. Their findings not only convinced him of the existence of yet unknown civilizations in the depths of the Amazon forest, but also of a lost knowledge and the fact that the Incas were not the first to know the technique to soften the stones, nor the authors of many architectural wonders that dot the entire Andean geography. In this book they are drawn some paragraphs that are a real surprise.

“The Incas inherited the strengths and cities built by a previous race and ruin restored without much difficulty convinced Fawcett writes, recalling his travels in Peru. They built with stone in the regions where this was the most suitable material , whereas for the coastal belt they generally used the adobe Old builders adopted the same and incredible joints that are characteristic of the oldest megalithic buildings, but the Incas made ​​no effort to use the big stone, previously amassed by her. predecessors. I heard that the Incas inherited their technique and embedded stones through a liquid that softened the surfaces to be joined to the consistency of clay. “

“¡yo no lo creo!” – dijo un amigo que había sido miembro de la Expedición peruana de Yale que descubrió Machu Picchu en 1911—.

“Yo he visto las canteras dónde estas piedras estaban cortadas -insistió-. Yo los he visto en todas las fases de preparación, y puedo asegurarlo, las superficies fueron trabajadas a mano y nada más!”

“Pero, otro amigo mío me contó la siguiente historia:

“Hace algunos años, cuando yo estaba trabajando en el campamento minero de Cerro de Pasco (un lugar a 14.000 pies (es decir, a 4.000 metros de altitud sobre el nivel del mar. N. de VA) , en los Andes del Perú Central), yo salí un domingo del campamento, con otros Gringos, para visitar algún viejo cementerio inca o Preinca, con la intención de ver si podíamos encontrar algo de valor. Tomamos la carretera a este lugar, y llevamos, claro, unas botellas de pisco y cerveza; y un peón, para que nos ayude a excavar en el cementerio.

Después de almorzar llegamos al camposanto, y el peón empezó a abrir algunas tumbas que parecían estar intactas. Trabajamos difícilmente, y aprovechábamos cada ocasión para tomar un trago. Yo no bebo, pero otros lo hicieron, sobre todo un muchacho que comenzó a beber demasiado pisco hasta emborracharse. Pero a pesar de tanto esfuerzo, sólo encontramos una vasija de barro, como de un cuarto de galón de capacidad, con un líquido espeso dentro de él.

“¡Yo apuesto la chicha!” -dijo el bebedor, totalmente fuera de sí—. “¡Lo probamos a ver qué clase de cosa bebió el inca! “

“Probablemente nos envenenemos si lo hacemos” –observó otro—.

“¡Entonces permitan que lo pruebe el peón!” -exclamó el borracho—.

Entonces rompieron el sello y sacaron el tapón de la vasija, olfatearon el contenido y llamaron al peón para que pruebe el misterioso líquido.

“Tome un trago de esta chicha” -pidió el borracho-. El peón tomó la vasija, dudó, y entonces, con el miedo pintado en su cara, lo empujó en las manos del borracho y retrocedió.

“No, no, señor” –murmuró—. “Eso no”. “¡Eso no es ninguna chicha!” -exclamó-. Entonces, el peón dio media vuelta y escapó.

El borracho puso la vasija sobre una piedra plana y corrió tras el peón. “¡Venga muchacho, agárrenlo!” –gritó—. Atrapamos al desgraciado hombre y lo llevamos a rastras de regreso; y de nuevo le exigimos que bebiera unos tragos de la vasija.

Pero el peón se enojó y en su resistencia todos forcejeamos violentamente con él, y en la pelea la vasija cayó al suelo, rompiéndose en mil pedazos. Y su contenido se derramó y formó un charco encima de la piedra plana.

Cada uno se rió. Era como un gran chiste, pero el esfuerzo de la excavación de la tumba nos había dejado exhaustos y sedientos. Y ellos fueron al saco dónde tenían guardadas las botellas de cerveza. Y comenzaron a beber.

Aproximadamente diez minutos después, yo me agaché sobre la piedra plana y por accidente examiné el charco del líquido derramado. Parecía que había más líquido derramado que antes; ¡Pero no era eso, la vasija entera dónde había estado el líquido, y la piedra bajo ella, eran tan suaves como el cemento fresco! Era como si la piedra se hubiera fundido, como la cera bajo la influencia del calor.”

Texto traducido y adaptado del libro: EXPLORATION FAWCETT, Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett (The Companion Book Club, London, 1954:317-318).

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

2.2. Exploración Fawcett II

“Buscamos en toda la Montaña peruana y boliviana un pájaro pequeño, como un martín pescador, que hace su nido en los agujeros redondos ubicados en las paredes rocosas de los acantilados del río. Estos agujeros simplemente pueden verse, pero no son fácilmente accesibles; y aunque parezca extraño, tales huecos sólo se encuentran donde los pájaros están presentes. Yo expresé mi sorpresa una vez, cuando ellos tuvieron bastante suerte en encontrar pájaros anidando en sus agujeros, que ahuecaron tan bien como si hubieran utilizado un taladro.”

“The holes make them ” They were the words of a man who had lived a quarter century in forests-. “I’ve seen them do contando- continued for a long time I have seen the birds enter the precipice leaves some kind of plant in their beaks;. These birds cling to the stone as they do to a tree, while rubbing the leaves in a circular motion above the surface of the rock. Then they flew off and returned with more leaves, and continued with the rubbing process. After three or four repetitions they dropped the leaves and began to kiss the stone with their sharp beaks, and-here’s the part wonderful- birds soon opened a round hole in the stone. Then the bird came out of his hole again, and left the rubbing process several times before proceeding kissing. It took several days but they had finally opened holes deeply enough to contain their nest. I’ve gone and taken a look at them, and believe me, a man could not drill a hole as neatly! “

“Do you mean that the bird’s beak can penetrate solid rock? Does a bird’s beak” Pito “penetrates solid wood, no? … I asked surprised.”

“No, I do not think that the bird can consume solid stone said the man. I think, as all who have seen, I think those birds know a sheet having a juice that can soften the stone until it is as wet clay. “

“I took this as a great story-and then, after hearing similar stories across the country, I found a popularly tradition. However, on one occasion, an English friend of unquestionable reliability told me a story that can shed more light on it:

“My nephew was in the lowlands, in the country of Chuncho in Rio Pyrenee (Perene), north of Peru (Note 6) , and one day his horse was injured, left him with a neighbor’s farm, approximately five miles from its destination, and was walking home. The next day, he resumed the road to regain his horse and took a shortcut through a forest that had never before penetrated. He wore his pants riding worn hiking boots, spurs and large English type-not small, but large Mexican spurs Largo- four inches, and these spurs were almost new. When he came to a farm, after a hot and difficult hike through thick bush, his surprise was huge when he discovered that “something” had “eaten” his beautiful spurs, being these reduced to a black point of just one-eighth of an inch. Given the uncertainty of the boy, the owner of the farm where was happening asked, then, if by chance some plant had stepped a foot tall, with dark reddish leaves. My nephew recalled at once that he had gone through a wide area where the land was densely covered with such a plant. ” That’s him!” – He exclaimed the chacarero-. “That’s what his spurs ate away! That is the material that the Incas used to shape the stones! The juice will soften the rock from the bottom up to be like paste. You should show me where he found the plants.” When they returned to find the place, they could not find it. “It is not easy to retrace the steps in a jungle where there is no path.”

This text was translated and adapted from the book: EXPLORATION Fawcett Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett (The Companion Book Club, London, 1954: 105-106).

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

3. Those strange stones …

The Canadian traveler investigator Richard Nisbet (13) , who was a long time in the region of Cusco and Puno, conducted a thorough investigation into this mystery. It haunted by the legend and rugged geography of this region of southern Peru, he began collecting various testimonies about the existence of a technique used by the Incas to soften the stones. His traveling companion, Kurt Bennett, took a series of truly stunning photographs that give rise to amazement and controversy. The pictures of some of them-and their legends, speak for themselves.

Figure 7.jpg (37516 bytes)

7 . A “seat very high “…
Photo: Kurt Bennett .

“Which of these stone carvings that seem to have no purpose, can be of any use? The steps and steps that do not go anywhere, seats where no one can sit. They must be found in astonishing abundance in the area around Cusco. Their sizes are so exact, with outside and inside corners so sharp and thin.

How they were carved?

And equally strange, why they were carved? “

Figure 8.jpg (37026 bytes)

Figure 8 . Huaca ¿? ¿Altar? ¿Temple?
Photo: Kurt Bennett .

“Most of the stories that tell of the Cusco huacas comes from the priest Bernabé Cobo, Jesuit who wrote them many years after the conquest. Each of these places received the support of a family. Each dacha had prescribed the sacrifices to be made on special days. Most of the sacrifices were not human, but Cobo reported that in 32 of these places required human sacrifice, usually children. This is questioned by many who see their statistical rationalization for conquest, it was, after all, an excuse to bring true religion to the natives. “

Figure 9.jpg (35903 bytes)

Figure 9 . Stairs to nowhere.
Photo: Kurt Bennett .

“As they were carved is a mystery. The art is lost, perhaps because its use was lost before the Conquest. Because it is” another matter “. It is no use to find the answer in the rigid and complex religion of the Incas. Most these strange carvings are sacred places called Temples.

There were 333 huacas in and around Cusco (considered sacred places that could be a spring, a rock, a tree or a building. N. VA) . They were located along imaginary lines 40 or “ceques” radiating like a wagon wheel in the Coricancha, the Temple of the Sun in Cusco. “

Figure 10.jpg (45453 bytes)

Figure 10 . Chair “in memoriam”.
Photo: Kurt Bennett .

“Not all of these carvings were part of the official Inca religion. Some were personal, family. If a relative loved to sit in a particular rock while he was alive, his family could carve a seat there as a monument.

That does not make it, “and that” it is more obvious .

In fact, there apparently have an idea how to do more. “

Figure 11a.jpg (41278 bytes)

 

Figure 11b.jpg (38211 bytes)

11a – 11b . “Bank”.
Photo: Kurt Bennet .

“Two steps with tape near the” bank. “Notice the rounded edges and the overall appearance of aging stone. Some think that the carving was done before the last glacier that” carved “for thousands of years.”

Figure 12.jpg (36804 bytes)

Figure 12 . ¿Lunar Temple?
Photo: Kurt Bennet .

“Not far from Cusco, there is a hill called” the Temple of the Moon “. The hill has several caves and many oscillating sizes. Some of the carvings here show extreme wear and weathering .

Note the horizontal bar near the center of the photograph. For lack of a better word, we call a “bank” .

Figure 13.jpg (24909 bytes)

Figure 13 . monoliths Ollantaytambo.
Photo: Kurt Bennett .

“Ollantaytambo is, but unique, rare in Peru. The giant monoliths that you see here are part of what must have been a sacred or temple place. In an unknown, for reasons unknown time, work was mysteriously stopped in this huge project. “

This text was translated and adapted from: Unusual Andean Stoneworking (13)

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

4. Colaptes rupicola or Colaptes pitius ?

In our search for information about the mysterious enigma woodpecker we had an apparent confusion of names and definitions regarding the identity of the alleged bird of legend. In order to settle this issue we decided to compare the information obtained from various sources, starting with version Aukanaw (see subchapter 1.2.), Where the author describes the Pitiwe , vulgar name Colaptes pitius . This woodpecker, as we have seen, also nests in Chile with the same scientific name in Argentina. In both countries, this variety of bird gets virtually the same common names with some variations ( P’chiu, Pitiu and Pitiwe in the Mapuche language, and Pitihue and Pythian , in the Spanish language). The uniqueness of it is that, in parallel, another woodpecker, inhabitant of the highlands and eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes and who also lives in Ecuador, part of Bolivia and even in northern Chile, is called Pythian North in Chilean lands while in Peru it is the aforementioned Pito or Pitu .

In Chile, the Pythian North or Carpenter Andino also receives the names of Pitihue, Pitigüe, Pythian and Yacoyaco , while in Peru they call besides Pito or Pitu , Acajllo, Jacajllo, Yactu and Yarakaka -the three last names are from the region of Puno. And when they come to Chile, they happen to have the abovementioned, especially names Pythian North and Pitihue , the latter being one of the most common names also referred Colaptes pitius of Patagonia Argentina.

This often feathery mess, as you can see, arose from the common names that they were either given to the representatives of the two species of woodpeckers in both Argentina and Chile and Peru. For while in Argentina Patagonia to Pitiwe or Colaptes pitius also call Pitihue , the Pythian or Pythian North Chile, or Colaptes rupicola , also it is known as Pitihue . And this Pythian North is both the Pito or Pitu Peru.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

4.1. Two birds and a mystery

So which of these birds is the bird of legend? The answer to this mess seems ornithological, right there in the legend. And in the versions of those people who say they have been carrying in its beak strange plant to cup their nests on the rocks and high forest of the Andes and the deep gorges of the Andean rivers that are fanned the Amazon plain noisy.

Both Hiram Bingham and Brian Fawcett bird speak Pito , and this is the name that the locals know the eastern foothills of the Peruvian Andes and the jungle from Cusco to the northernmost area Perene river, and even It is said to have been seen in Puno and Bolivia. Other versions collected by researchers in this mysterious archeology, bird certainly speak Pitu carrying in its beak leaves “Pito grass or Pitu” that softens the stone. Thus, all agree that the Pito as the bird of the secret herb of the Incas.

A secret which also seems to know the Pitiwe , if we believe Aukanaw. Do not forget that the Pitiwe Argentine is also a woodpecker, in fact, a Colaptes pitius a Picidae , so if we are to believe what he says it is, we have every reason to think it has something to do with this incredible story. Likewise, the Pito or Pitu like its Peruvian counterpart, North Pythian or Pitihue Chilean one, is a Colaptes rupicola bird by definition, and also seems to have something in common, and this, even more so by its presence in Peruvian myths. Both species therefore have the same customs, both make their nests on the rocks, and both, as in the plane of legend and controversy, know the secret of the wonderful plant. And although both species, ultimately, are first cousins, the Pito is who seems to have the lead … and the strongest in the legends of the stones softeners.

Figure 14.jpg (9524 bytes)

Figure 14 . Colaptes rupicola.
Picture of the Smithsonian Institution (Washington) 1999.

Figure 15 . Colaptes pitius.
Image obtained Portal Viarural
.

Figure 15.jpg (13001 bytes)

Now what is missing to fully identify the famous plant that softens the stone, and this would have to ask the Pit or … or Pitiwe which unfortunately can not speak. The legend and controversy, then, are still served. Meanwhile, Jotcha good father Lira no signs of life, at least not yet scientific citizenship card … because official science can not see.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

4.2. Rara avis …

The number of Supreme Decree 013-99-AG (13a) , enacted by the Peruvian Government on May 19, 1999, was a response to the concern that wildlife in danger of extinction. The curious thing about this legislation is that states like the variety very rare species Colaptes rupicola . No doubt the bird ever had to draw the attention of the authorities to tell them was splashing and pecking between the Andes and misty forests. This curious bird that lives enveloped by the silence of the highlands and ancestral legends do not leave him alone. Like other mysterious birds, small Pito has become the fetish of his own myth. And in a bird of great interest to science as can be seen in the descriptive table following below : (16)

Figure 16.jpg (28420 bytes)

Figure 16 . Overview of the Andean Flicker .
illustration Agualtiplano Net.

Colaptes rupicola
GENERAL INFORMATION

It is a typical woodpecker in the highlands of the Andes. Like all woodpeckers, it presents special adaptations to make holes in search of food, as a specialization in drilling wood and tree trunks through the peak. They have special muscles in the head and neck, they do not bend the neck easily.

Habitat

Distribution

In highland pastures and fields, rocky slopes, in abandoned houses to rest and nest. From 2000 – 5000 m in Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile.

Taxonomy tree

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Vertebrata Subphyllum
Gnathostomata Superclass
Class Aves
Subclass Neornithes
Infraclass Neoaves
Parvaclase Picae
Order Piciformes
Picides Infraorder
Family Picidae
Genus Colaptes

IDENTIFICATION

Scientific synonyms

This species does not have scientific synonyms registered.

Common names

Carpenter serrano (Spanish)
Andean flicker (English)
Acajllo
jacajllo (Puno)
Llactu (Puno)
Yaracaca (Puno)
Pythian North (Chile, Spanish)
Pitihue (Chile)
yacoyaco (Chile)

Scientific description

Scientific name Andean Flicker
Author D’Orbigny
Year 1840
The male has a bright red crown, the body is generally yellowish, the dorsal part is striped black, the rump and belly are cream until softly lined or heavily mottled black cinnamon. The tail is black. Measures approximately 37 cm.
It is a daytime and insectivorous bird. Walking hopping in search of food excavating the earth with its long beak, to find larvae of moths or beetles.It breeds in gaps located between rocks and walls of adobe houses usually abandoned. Sometimes it placed in holes dug nest in trees Polylepis. It lays eggs between September and October.


They are cautious but easy to observe. They meet in small groups in pastures for their wedding deployment.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

5. The Andean Ephedra , a plant osprey

Aukanaw, in his text devoted to bird enigma Pitiwe and grass which dissolves the iron and stone, reminds us of the existence of a medicinal plant by the Mapuche-considered growing in the Andean highlands, from Ecuador to the Strait of Magellan . Botanists call Ephedra Andean , and one of those suspected of being the famous and much sought after herb of the Incas.

Not surprisingly, by instinct, animals avoid it, because we have seen what happens when ingested: it is known of small mammals such as foxes and guinea pigs who have succumbed to their bloated bodies and debris bones juices from branches and leaves. The Mapuche shamans much appreciated for its medicinal properties and as a ritual item. In Argentina, also known as solupe , Sulupe , Punco Punco , Solder Soldering , Ponytail , Tramontana , Trasmontana , Pico de gallo or Pinko-pinko . In Peru receives almost the same names that have given the Mapuche in Patagonia, along with other native: Q’ero-q’ero , Ponytail , Condorsava , Likchanga , Pachatara , Pfinco-pfinco , Pinco-pinco , Pingo- Pingo , Weld with welding , Weld-welded , Wacua

It is a shrub densely branched junciformes branches up to 40 cm; sometimes stalk the stands, other bows; whorled branches. Escamiformes leaves in whorls at the nodes. The flowers are whorled, dioecious, inconspicuous: the female little protected by bracts overlapping with globosa seminiferous scale; male with 6 stamens. The seed is arylated, “pseudobaya” which resembles a once dry nucule.

Figure 17.jpg (36817 bytes)

Figure 17 . Ephedra Andean in their natural environment.
Image obtained Portal Hanfmediem.

It is used as forage, some llamas eat their leaves, stems and fruits -suponemos know how to do without the afecte-. Regular palatability for sheep (Tapia and Flores 1984), those who like to eat berries (Vargas 1988). As a medicinal plant is an excellent diuretic and debugger diseases of the bladder, pyorrhea healing, in inflammation of the gums (Soukup). The plants of the genus Ephedra contains alkaloids ephedrine and pseudoephedrine 1-3 (1 to 1.57%) which are used therapeutically in the forms of sulfate and ephedrine hydrochloride, as a respiratory stimulant, especially for the treatment of bronchial asthma; also as sudoríficador, antipyretic and sedative cough; Mydriatic action has so used in ophthalmology to dilate the pupil (Aldava and Mostacero, 1988).

Figure 18.jpg (28487 bytes)

Figure 18 . Descriptive Sketches of the Andean Ephedra. AG. Ephedra Andean Poepp. Ex Meyer; A branch of a female plant (X 1); B. Strobile female (X 50); C. Fruit (X 50); D. Branches of a male plant (X 1); E. Male inflorescence (X 50); F. male Strobile (X 50); G. Male flower (X 50).
Reed Gallery. Digital Library of the University of Chile (Santiago).

Bears fruit in autumn. It grows in places with semi-desert climate. Western slopes and inter-Andean areas, between 1300-4500 m (Weberbauer 1945 ). In Yura, Pampa de Arrieros, Cañahuas Sumbay Vizcachani and down to Chivay, 2600-4300 m . (Note 7)

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

6. The enigma of Collao

“Oh, come Viracocha, Lord of all the world
big as the sky, the source of all
creative men, ten times salute you.
With eyes on earth I look
like I look for the source when I feel thirsty
all the voice I have I call you…”

Capac Yupanqui. Fifth King Inca

Were really primitive ancient Andean societies erected monuments and buildings of cities like Tiwanaku? The old stone cities of the Andes represent, without doubt, a challenge to science.

What else in the world you can find a city of Tiwanaku bill as impossible? And why in the Andes? And is that the ruins found in the current Bolivian territory, about 20 kilometers south of Lake Titicaca, true Mediterranean sea, once sacred to the Incas, for the Aymara and Colla, the brave people who gave name to this region are not just a pile of rubble. To begin, the altitude at which this city is 4,000 m. above the sea, it is a real torture for those not used to living with less oxygen than normal. Nobody knows exactly when it was built or how. Although archaeologists say it dates from the year 200 BC. C and 600 AD, the truth is that there is enough evidence to believe that their making is much older than you think. The blocks that make up the buildings are huge and some of them weigh hundreds of tons. Found quarries where they come from, and are at distances ranging between 100 and 200 km., However, this does not solve the problem of how and when and why such large transport distances and a place inhospitable, and the mystery remains frozen in time and the coldness of the Altiplano.

Figure 19 (copy) .jpg (11924 bytes)

Figure 19 . A door to nowhere, this lytic structure seems to unite this world do not know what else …
Photo obtained Portal Ancient and Lost Civilizations .

Figure 20 . Allegory of the past . Map showing the location of Tiahuanaco south of Lake Titicaca.
Drawing published on the website Ancient and Lost Civilizations .

Figure 20.jpg (10486 bytes)

It is presumed that some of these stones were brought across Lake Titicaca during the season flood waters and where it is still kissed the docks of the city, the same can still be seen, surrounded by earth and stones. Something had to happen for some time in the distant past the lake 20 kilometers north, to the bed where he is now retired. Other of these stones, for the technical difficulties of transportation, had to have come overland. It is theorized that perhaps lubricated wet ramps were built with clay to make up the stones on slopes. It is therefore a technological dilemma is the size of its mystery. Scientists do not agree, and while some argue that if this was not the system used, had to be another sort. It has even ventured forced labor of thousands of slaves who have sweated the fat drop to move those blocks from one place to another. But so little is known of that society that built a huge city at that stage, that just leads to the most amazing speculation.

Figure 21.jpg (21977 bytes)

Figure 21 . The semi-subterranean temple of Tiwanaku. Who would have thought the Spaniards arrive at a deserted city built in the middle of the frigid highlands? His feeling had to be similar to the Incas, who, a century before them, conquered the plateau of Collao. Note at the bottom of the wall image intriguing sculpted gargoyle heads; are dozens of stony faces showing traits of different breeds, some indigenous -nothing unknown that adorn this fabulous temple.
Photo Portal obtained Ancient and Lost Civilizations
.

When the Incas arrived in this area in the fifteenth century, this city was already abandoned long ago. The locals did not even know what it was called originally. Legend has it that the Inca Mayta Capac, the conqueror of Collao, sent a Chasqui (messenger) to Cusco to give news of the new conquest. When the man returned a few days later, the president, admired for his physical strength, he exclaimed: “ICTY-wanaco” , composed voice in Quechua means “sit down and rest, guanaco” . . And thus renamed this desert city in the sixteenth century, the Spaniards who came to these places received the same impression: solitude and mystery. Hispanic chroniclers legends recall the Incas told them about the origin of this city. They claimed that Tiwanaku was built by white men with beards, led by the god Tiki Viracocha, a name that later inspired Thor Heyerdahl, who in 1947 named his raft as Kon-Tiki because he was convinced that the same people had to sea westward to found the construction company of statues of Easter Island.

Figure 22.jpg (14860 bytes)

Figure 23.jpg (16291 bytes)

Figures 22 and 23 . The navigator of the mist. E l Norwegian Thor Heyerdahl, without doubt, completely upset our way of perceiving the past thanks to its bold and courageous sea voyages archaeological theories. In the picture below, the legendary Kon Tiki sailed from Callao to its historic journey to Polynesia.
PlayasPerú photos portal.

Around this city they have poured the most deluded assumptions. While Heyerdahl believed that the first settlers used rafts, and did not believe in the possibility of extraterrestrial intervention. Erich von Daniken, however, said that the beings of four fingers (?) Whose features are engraved on some stones of Tiwanaku are portraits of ancestors who came from space. But with all this, the challenge is to show that archeology is conventional explanations are possible. It has been suggested even arrange transportation of a carved block of 100 tonnes for uneven terrain (forests and rivers included) from a distance of 160 km., Something very difficult for our technical capabilities. To this is added the fact, more than likely, that carry similar monoliths, but the system used is discovered, it will not answer to the riddle of the origin of this puzzling stone town.

Figure 24.gif (2657 bytes)

Figure 24 . The Kon Tik god i ‘The same Tiki Viracocha – that inspired Thor Heyerdahl its marine adventure. Note beard wearing this character.
Illustration portal PlayasPeru.
Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

6.1. The metropolis of Lost Time

Browse these ruins is faced with an incomprehensible past. In the early twentieth century, the ruins were subjected to systematic pillaging by locals of the area, which caught the attention of Arthur Posnansky (14) , an archaeologist at the University of La Paz, who managed to stop looting and started investigate the past of Tiwanaku. In his book, Tiahuanaco, the cradle of the American man , believed to the last Tiwanaku civilization appeared around 14,000 years before C. and that at some distant time there was a geological phenomenon of horrific proportions fractionated the Andes. Afterwards According to this author, there was a rise in the region of Lake Titicaca about ten thousand years ago after the collapse of vast areas of land (Mu, Atlantis).

It’s a posture that certainly many specialists refuse to accept, but they also find answers to many of the mysteries posed by these stone buildings, for example, the aforementioned presence of faces carved of different races in the mural of the semi-subterranean temple. On the other hand, few explain why, coinciding with the theory launched by Posnansky, found petrified shells and fossils of marine animals molluscs around the plateau of Collao something that is repeated throughout the Andina geography, besides remains of what might have been or marine coastal beaches over 4,000 meters on the plateau of Collao.

Figure 25.jpg (2363 bytes)

Figures 25 and 26 . The Archaeologist A rthur Posnansky had the merit of saving what was left of Tiwanaku. In the other photo, walls and stone blocks scattered on the ground give an idea of the greatness of this city.
Images portals South American Pic and Crystalink.

Figure 26.jpg (20656 bytes)

But outside of conjecture, it is no secret amazement that cause huge buildings in this city, real traces of an inexplicable technology. Everything here is gigantic, up the stairs. The stones are showing a lithic art unparalleled anywhere else in the world. One of the statues, for example, is a carved block of one piece which is over seven meters high and weighs about 10 tons, while another rock, almost nine tonnes is a monolith of three meters high, It has some disconcerting signs carved on their six sides. There are dozens of statues of impassive look that seem to mock the logic and time … and the most outlandish theories, taking into account that the nearest Tiahuanaco quarry is more than 100 kilometers away, and archaeologists coconut breaking to know how he came there.

Likewise also surprise their -Doors porches where the icy breeze blows the desolate Puna, magical entries where the stars of the night countless paths, like the famous Puerta del Sol, amazing monolith of 3 meters high slip, 4 wide, half a meter thick, carved from a single stone; in this massive structure, door and false windows have been cut with the chisel, and the sculptures of the frieze, which is crowned by the high relief of an unknown character flanked by a series of carved on both sides figures, which some have seen as Writing an unknown or mysterious “Venus calendar” – they are carved into the rock and weighs over 10 tons. Another statue, one-piece, is 8 meters high, one thick and weighs 20 tons. But this is nothing compared to those blocks that resist the logic.

 

Figures 27 and 28 . A statue of impenetrab you look. Nobody knows when it ceased to be a column of a large room or if it represents one of those white men of legend, but the truth is that for centuries contemplated the horizon. In the other photo, the Puerta del Sol looks wonderful magical entry into the unknown.
Images obtained from archeology portals Trumpfheller / bo19.htm and Crystalinks.

Figure 28.jpg (27659 bytes)

The chronicler of Portuguese origin, Alcobaza Diego, who visited Tiwanaku shortly after the Spanish Conquest, wrote: “between the buildings of Tiahuanaco lakeshore there is a square of 24 square meters, attached to one side a living 14 meters in length. Both the living and the square are formed in one piece. A true masterpiece carved in the rock … there are many statues of men and women, which are so perfect features that seem alive “ .

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

6.2. “Rivets” prehispanic

For its part, the Spanish naturalist Marcos Jimenez de la Espada (17) , who was in the Peruvian Altiplano – Bolivia in the late nineteenth century, noted that one of the buildings of the city is one of the wonders of the world. Large blocks of stone 37 feet long by 15 wide, they were united without lime or mortar, with such precision that limits warned barely a glance. Another peculiarity of this city makes the ancient inhabitants of Tihuanaco true geniuses of plumbing and hydraulic engineering. The town had a complicated network of water collection brought and why it was supplied with fresh water from above, and had other channels that are supposed served for watering gardens.

It also found traces of an advanced metallurgy. Blended with pure copper they produced nails and staples to hold the blocks of buildings, what we would call rivets, which has not been seen anywhere in the Andes. Also notable was his skill in polished and burnished metal, lost mold casting, welding and silver, in addition to hammering and embossing. All that was found in Tiahuanaco and preserved in museums, fully test this gigantic city was melting pot of civilizations.

Figure 29.jpg (15897 bytes)

Figure 29 . Plane Tiahuanaco.
Image obtained from Crystalinks portal.

Some researchers have wanted to give cosmic dimensions and Tiahuanaco try to explain the enigma of the stones. This is the case of Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier , missing authors of The Return of the Witches , (Note 8) who cite the American historian A. Hyatt Verrill, who dedicated 30 years of his life to studying the vanished civilizations of Central America and South, who writes: “the highlands of Bolivia and Peru evokes another planet … that is not Earth, Mars is Oxygen pressure is there half the sea level accuracies Recent lean.. thinking men who lived thirty thousand years ago human beings who knew metalworking, which had observatories and had a science that enabled them to carry out works that are almost impossible with the current means;. some of the irrigation works would be to hard barely achievable with our electric drills. And men who did not use the wheel built large paved roads ?.

The old Aymara and Uros Titicaca still remember the white gods came one day to teach civilization and then left with the promise to return. Since then they came to occupy the pantheon of his fantastic stories. For the legends, the gods were white, tall, blond, bearded and blue eyes, and built the oldest city in America and maybe the world.

And when tanning llama herder observed the sky and feel the arrival of wind and rain heralding the end of the dry season, evokes the creator of the Andean dumb, and says … comes Viracocha !

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

7. Other hypotheses: the Egyptian question

Returning with stones softeners (see Chapter I), Juanjo Perez continues detailing the details of this amazing technique of antiquity, it seems, had global reach. Dr. Joseph Davidovits-a famous researcher who lives in Paris, author of some studies geopliméricos materials, considered among the most revolutionary for the industry since the invention of the plásticos-, together with Marguie Morris, published in 1988 the book The Pyramids: An Enigma Solved (Dorset Press, New York, 1988). This book has become a key to understanding the mystery of the stone softening work in ancient Egypt. “It explains Perez Davidovits exposed numerous examples of constructions made ​​of Egyptian pharaohs softening the stone, shaping it and then returning it to hardening a Once it was placed in its final position. Furthermore, Dr. Davidovits shows microscopic analysis and X-rays inside which stones have been discovered hair, air bags, textiles, etc. “

Hair, air bags, textiles when supposedly blocks of the Great Pyramid are natural. We wonder, in the same way that the author of the note and its caught words: “How is it possible that the stones used to build the Great Pyramid of Cheops human hair are How they came remains of fibers? those tissues into solid rock from the Pharaonic architecture? For the researcher Manuel Delgado the explanation is simple and suggests that the ancient Egyptians knew how to turn the hardest rock in a slurry that could collect debris during handling, materials or clump, as is the case with bread dough or sweet while being manipulated by confectioners.

“Perez continues: The truth is that microscopic debris Davidovits found inside more than 20 rocks of that historical epoch seem to prove the existence of such a technique. But there are many other corroborating evidence, such as artificial clefts certain monuments or plasters added to some buildings, and even pyramids mastabas. Like a potter would correct an error in his work, adding bits of clay on defects and some chunks of rock ’embedded’ in apparent gaps or failures in certain appear necropolis or pharaonic monuments. “

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

7.1. The god Khnum teaches chemistry

How did they do it? As has happened with other archaeological enigmas of the past, the “secret formula” to soften the stones, the technique “melted” the hardest rocks, according Davidovits and Manuel Delgado, seems to be on the call wake of Famine (15) . This surprising writing is actually a relief formed by over 2,600 hieroglyphs divided into 32 columns, where the formulas dictated by God described Jnum Pharaoh Zosher , who rose to his eternal rest the famous step pyramid of Saqqara.

The inscription, discovered in 1889 by Charles Wilbour in Sehel Island, three kilometers from Aswan, is also known as the Chemical Jnum Trail . “The reason for such unusual name explains Perez is simple: in it, according Davidovits, is the chemical recipe for building a “Sorcerer’s Stone” able to soften the rock. “

Figure 30.jpg (17419 bytes)

Figure 30 . The mysterious wake of Famine has much to tell investigators.
Image Portal pyramidology.
   

Figure 31.jpg (10217 bytes)

Figure 31 . strange impression of an object on stone “softened”.
Image Portal pyramidology.

Like Father Jorge Lira in Peru he experimented Davidovits softening of the stone based on the texts of the Famine Stele. He managed to soften limestone, but, like its Peruvian counterpart, struggled to re-solidify the stones evenly.

As noted by the author of the article, such a technique responds to a form of technology -. In this case chemically hardly fits with our knowledge of the past “Now the queen Hatshepsut, the Sphinx is currently held in Memphis, he wrote on the obelisk more Large temple Karnak that ” future generations will wonder about the technique and hoisting of this great monolith Looks like the great Egyptian pharaoh more than 3,500 years ago knew them all-. The secret of this technique, applied both buildings inspired by the sovereign as in many other pharaonic monuments is, largely based on the softening of the stone.

Manuel Delgado, a researcher who, along with Egypt and half the world, has also toured much of the Americas, confirms that found evidence of stone softening technique in Mexico, Peru and other countries. The stones softened plateau Nasca Machu-Picchu or the Great Pyramid seem to show that there was an equally or more advanced than our science in the distant past. “Attributing this technology concludes Delgado to an earlier civilization Atlantis, or the presence of aliens, is a matter of opinion. But at this point no one can deny the evidence that our history is not like us have had … “

They initiates the unknown science, softened the stones. The Incas apparently inherited some of that knowledge.

But history has forgotten. The stones are there, the mystery too.

Nobody knows how they did it. No one is able to find the wonderful plant. Nobody can do it, but neither can say, even the bird Pitiwe .

As Aukanaw say, for the curious seeking quantitative and not qualitative things, “… if you want to know more about this herb, and if your ears are ready to hear the voice of the Nuke Mapu (Mother Earth) do not hesitate to ask your guardian, the wise bird Pitiwe, and he knows answer with his usual clarity:

Pitiwe! Pitiwe! “

That is all…

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

8. Find out more …

About Aukanaw work. http://www.geocities.com/ aukanawel / ruka / chillka / acercade.html

Binational Autonomous Authority of Lake Titicaca. http://www.pnud.bo/ biodiversidadtdps ​​/ alt / estudios.html

Endangered birds. Birdlife Peru. http://www.conam.gob.pe/endb/ docs / base / wildlife / avesamenaz.htm # def% 20in% 20PELIGRO

 

Birds of Peru – List of endangered species. http://www.conam.gob.pe/ ENDB / docs / base / wildlife / aves.htm

Bird of the highlands. http://www.unesco.org.uy/ mab / documentospdf / puna6.pdf

Coricancha or Temple of the Sun. http://www.antropologia.com.ar/ peru / corican2.htm

The rising of the stone. http://www.cbc.org.pe/ rao / dondelapiedra2.htm

The birds of the Ria de Noia – Pito Real . http://www.riadenoia.com/ pito.htm

White man visits the pre-Columbian Americas. http://www.fabiozerpa.com/ ElQuintoHombre / enero02 / Neoantrop_11.htm

 

Machu Picchu, the story is not known. http://www.unitru.edu.pe/arq/ machu.html

Medicinal plants used by the Mapuche. http://www.plantasmedicinales.org/ ethno / etno8.htm

The Machu Picchu Bingham “found” http://www.caretas.com.pe/ 2001/1680 / articles / machupicchu.phtml

Flora Basin Santiago (Chile) http://mazinger.sisib.uchile.cl/repositorio/lb/ ciencias_quimicas_y_farmaceuticas / navasl01 /

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

9. Did you know that …

… The variety Colaptes rupicola scientifically identified and named by the French naturalist Alcides D’Orbigny in 1840, who differed from its closest relative, the Colaptes pitius . Significantly he puts the term “rupícola” for its habit of nesting on the rocks. This woodpecker is therefore a rock bird, hence the name.

“The Ornithological diversity of Peru is the largest known in the world. There are more than 1,700 species reported for the country (O’Neill, 1992) , distributed in 587 genera, 88 families and 20 orders. “

… According to the National Biodiversity Program CONAM (Peru), in this country is home to about 111 endemic bird species considered endangered, of which about 6 does not have distribution in the Andes.

… The woodpecker belongs to the family Picidae the order of Piciformes , of which more than 212 species distributed throughout the world except in Oceania are known.

… Father Jorge Lira the secret was Jotcha to the grave. No one has been identified as strange plant, and many specialists venture speculation, it has even been suspicious of the Andean Ephedra .

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10. Epilogue: Two Views

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban the Incas their buildings?

“How the Incas were getting huge stone blocks of different shapes, fit into their cyclopean walls with absolute precision? We try to shed light on this mystery.”

By: Christopher Boada
magazine Enigmas (Barcelona) no.
64
Posted on 01/02/2002

“Each of these walls has been designed and assembled by one person normally -of height and weight, only between one and three weeks without the aid of any modern concrete more than a mechanical element. Also, to move and fit perfectly these huge blocks whose weight, in some cases, the ton-round have been used only a lever and a crowbar. This may seem impossible, it is not, but, yes, is tricky. Perhaps the same as the Inca civilization employed at the time to build, quickly and accurately, lots of walls formed by irregular stones that fit together perfectly, with minimum staff and minimum effort, however, is a system so so simple that everyone can play at home.

Some time ago, in the context of the comprehensive report of lker Jimenez entitled Elizari Last Secret of the Incas (see ENIGMAS year VI, no. 8), Fernando Jiménez del Oso gave us a solution to this problem that has so many headaches caused to the students of this culture in a box entitled The Secret of the Inca walls. According to him, the system used by the Incas to simplify the construction of the walls is “to make the carving and adjustment, not vertically, but horizontally and roll”. This solution, which at first seems so simple but it had never occurred to anyone, and had been exposed earlier by the doctor, in 1988, in the series “Empire of the Sun” on the absolute andinas.ón cultures? We try to shed light on this mystery …

That employ rollers was new to me. But maybe that is the key, because although by other means had also concluded that the Incas “prefabricaban” walls horizontally.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.1.1. The hypothesis of “soft stone”

First, I left the preconceived idea that the Incas ‘reblandecían’ stones somehow, if not entirely, then at least superficially. The marks like scratches on the soft soap or mass of bread on the face side of many of the stones that make up the imposing fortresses of Sacsayhuaman and Ollantaytambo, induce to think imprecisable some chemical or thermal method, or a combination both, if not made use of even more sophisticated systems.

In Sacsahuamán, for example, I saw a stone that was separated from its immediate neighbor by the passage of time (and probably also by earthquakes) something like the perfect fit extended not only by their outer edges, but in all It gives the depth de¡ wall. In addition, if a side face had a soft bulge in the adjacent soft hollow stone she complemented him perfectly and allowed adjustment to the tenth of a millimeter was observed. This ruled out using a saw or something sharp to produce such separation. The perfect fit between two stones, despite the gentle undulations, only could be achieved quickly if the stones had been previously softened by some unknown method, between the stones, for separation, he had inserted a thin metal foil .

Inevitably, any dent of said metal sheet have been reflected in the stones on both sides. Once they hardened, that sheet would retire leaving a minimum gap of only a few tenths of a millimeter.

However, despite all this evidence, there is no evidence at all that the Incas really enjoyed some method that allowed them to soften the stones. Even so, I started from the premise to make my experiments and, as a modern substitute for that hypothetical “soft rock” of the Incas, I used concrete and mortar ‘Portland’ suitably colored. But even accepting that hypothesis’ soft stone ‘, not good if we do not have more information, particularly with regard to the cut-out shapes of the stones.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.1.2. The “impossible” boundary stones

In early 1992, I watched the pictures of my first trip to Peru and comparing the construction of the Inca walls with traditional walls Roman style, I realized one thing: the walls in Roman style are initiated by the base and stones superiors conform to the shape left by the lower stones, upwards, until you reach the desired height, where it levels off and flush. However, in the Inca walls it is completely backwards; The wall starts at the desired height and lower stones have to adapt to the way the upper left by stones, downstream, reaching the ground or near it. So to speak, it is as if “the house were to start from the roof.” Over 95% of the stones fit this pattern.

Logically there must be a simple explanation and, after discarding many possibilities, I reached the conclusion that the walls prefabricaban on the ground horizontally. As is obvious, this position can start building from any side you want, and if they did through the top of the wall was certainly a seismic purpose.

Soon I realized that as well, horizontally, face side would be looking at the sky and, with the idea of ​​the ‘soft rock’ in mind, how ‘cushion’ of the stones tend to go out alone spontaneously. Likewise, I also realized that the gaps between the stones are all in a vertical, so that you can easily insert a thin metal sheet as a separation. In addition, you do not bend these metal foils in gimmicky and convoluted play zigzagging to get re-cut designs of Inca stone forms but Bas- ta fold the foil strips in a ‘J’, ‘U’ or ‘V’, in different sizes and models and supplemented with straight sections, to faithfully mimic any copy of the Inca stone style imaginable, including of course that of “12 angles”.

As it can be seen all shapes are very simple, and all plates are reversible and reusable for subsequent tranches of the same wall or other walls.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.1.3. How the blocks prefabricaban

I spent theory into practice. The aim was to reproduce the buildings looked as closely as possible with the limited means at the same time Inca. As a modern substitute hypothetical gold- perhaps foils used by that culture, I used for my experiments galvanized iron sheet 0.5 mm thick, cut into strips.

Thus, the width of the strip plate (always the same width for the same wall) is subsequently determine the wall thickness; and the length of the plate and the shape of the bending (combined with other plates) that determines the size of each stone and the contour thereof.

Once made the “preliminary design” of the forms of blocks, and taking into account the inclination of the rear wall, and proceed to the assembly of the various strips of iron, previously bent into a desired shape. This is done vertically supporting and / or slightly sinking the lower longitudinal edge of each of them on the ground, and then it is serving the same soil at the bottom of each hole to support or reinforce the plates on either side, avoiding so move when filling concrete (with this operation is also the rear wall also stay with dome shaped stones get).

After filling the holes to the edge of the plates, the way “padding” out effectively without effort, like ridges that appear spontaneously around some stones. And here precisely is where the penalty discoveries “on the fly” begins.

To give a finish with a faux-stone texture, simply fill each “pad” with a thin layer of dry soil and clods of earth itself, to sink on soft concrete, holes perfectly mimic natural stone. After a couple of days, once the concrete has set already, the earth and the clods with a jet of pressurized water is clean.

In this way it can mimic the texture of stone with holes, cracks and seams giving an impressive realism. For example, the vein that crosses diagonally across the large central stone in one of the photos, is nothing more than the union of a day concreted the next day. After a week and you can remove the wall and remove the plates. To eliminate the artificial glow left by the metal plates, perhaps the Incas had no choice but to “rattle” with something very hard all sides of each of the stones, just enough to make them rough but without removing thick.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.1.4. The construction of the wall

Prepared and all blocks, one can start mounting the wall in place and final location. But this is undoubtedly where the main problem arises: getting fit the wall with the floor. This requires making a coarser base development and not necessarily as polished stones, allowing align and level first row of prefabricated wall blocks. Until today, this detail had been interpreted as the Incas built their walls leveraging existing buildings of earlier cultures. Actually it could be a phase of the wall in their assembly process!

Once aligned and level achieved in the first row of stone blocks, the rest of the wall fits perfectly. No need to try different blocks even once, because for its execution, it is known beforehand that fit tenth of a millimeter. Still, when around a large stone several smaller match the sum of the thicknesses of the interseparaciones can reach produce a lag of 1.5 mm, which is not much, of course, but enough to upset the horn rest of the wall going up. Perhaps the best way to avoid this gap is to make the walls with large stones (the larger, less separations and therefore also less lag). But reading the work of the chroniclers of the era of colonization, we found another possible solution to address this gap: the Incas puntuales–sometimes between the stones apply a thin layer of clay. Apparently this thin would only serve to prevent chafing and improve the aseismic effect of the wall, but could also have the dual function of filling the gap left by the plates apart. This is the way that the Incas had to prefabricate a straight wall, but what ?, curved walls and corners ?, and portals trapezoidal ?, and large stones? If to make a straight wall is necessary prefabricarlo horizontally on a flat floor, apparently to make a curved wall must prefabricarlo on a floor or domed shaped mound. To make a corner just you have to lift the two ends of two sections of a wall to form a 45 degree angle to the ground and fill the gap rounding it (horizontally, rounded a corner also gives out alone and effortlessly). To play a portal, window niche or trapezoidal simple formwork work in two phases is necessary. And finally, the secret of large stones (and here’s the last part of ‘trick’) it is to leave the hollow stone below when prefabricated, which greatly lightens their weight for further manipulation, and once already mounted on the wall in its final position, it Encofra behind and filled. The end result is like the materialization of a metaphor: one person, vulgar and current, without more help than a crowbar and in no time, he is able to make, move, position and fit to the tenth of a millimeter a huge block You can exceed a tonne. If I had had the help of just a couple of people or a crane, this method could have done even twice as large stones and heavy.

As a softening and subsequent solidification of the stone footprints would, I think, in its composition, perhaps the best way out of serious doubts conduct a paleomagnetic analysis to all and every one of the stones of a compact group of 4 or 5 down her face sight. This operation may find out several things: whether the tastings had a paleomagnetic orientation in their different outermost part of its deepest or inner part, it could mean that at some point in the manipulation of the stones they were softened surface in some way; and if the external orientation had in all in the same direction together mean that already at the time of softening. It was also asked if they were hardened in horizontal. Conversely, if the tastings show the same paleomagnetic orientation in all its depth and guidance, in turn, it was uneven among the different stones, the idea of ​​the ‘soft rock’ we should abandon.

But on the other hand, if finally it were shown that the Incas themselves possessed some method to soften the rock, we should consider other questions, such as the transport of the stones that make up the walls. For me this is a big, or mystery, that the construction of the wall itself; because I’m not convinced the traditional official version says that the great stones were brought rolling or dragged from their quarry of origin only on the basis of human endeavor, through the irregular topography of the land, more than 3,000 meters high in many cases, to its final destination in the wall under construction. And then … back again! Thus block after block.

But if we discard this form of transport which other more left? Clearly much remains to be discovered. Someday we will know the whole truth? The enigma remains. “

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.2. Inca stones lose their mystery

“The American architect Jean Pierre Protzen played his entire construction process.”

“An investigation showed that extract, transport, cut and set stones to build large buildings was within the possibilities of the Incas.”

Norian Muñoz
published in the newspaper El Universal of Caracas – Tuesday, February 18, 1997.

“Caracas. One of the questions that has caused more speculation throughout history is how the Incas managed to extract monumental stone blocks, debastarlos and unite so that not a razor fits between them? The answer to this question She found in a Peruvian quarry Protzen Jean Pierre, professor of architecture at the University of California, USA, who recently came to our guest for a doctorate at the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism of the Central University of Venezuela country.

Protzen managed to play on the site throughout the construction process that began in the quarry and ended with the development of the imposing walls. Thus it was proved that everything could be done perfectly with the Inca technology, thanks to a very special debastar stones and make them fit each other, even without iron tools so.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.2.1. “The madman of the quarry”

The architect explains in fluío learned Spanish in Peru, it all started in 1979 after dictate some courses at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil. Before returning to the United States, he decided to visit some sites that attracted Latin America, including Machu Picchu. He was impressed with the constructive ability of the Incas, but nobody had a coherent explanation of how they had done these buildings. Among the arguments he found their guides even the intervention of alien forces.

Back in the United States, Protzen found very little information on these buildings. He decided to investigate on their own, he went to Peru in 1982 during his gap year and managed to fund his college project. During the first days in Peru, I had no idea where to start, all I did was watch. Gradually he realized he had to find answers to four key areas: how the stone extracted, how did individual blocks, how fit and how transported.

Very few people of Ollantaytambo, a town where he settled, knew where the quarries were. Contrary to what I expected, not the tradition of removing the rock and carve the Inca way, so that nobody is kept knew the treatment.

He touched then experience long days and carving stones. It was a process of trial and error until he found the right technique, which consisted of stone debastar gradually using another river rock as a hammer. While doing his experiments locals called it ‘the madman of the quarry’. To demonstrate how it should be transporting stone blocks, Protzen all the people involved, which is provided to move a huge stone to where today are the ruins. All parts of the process were reproduced. To try to expose Protzen easily explained: ‘in the stone quarry was worked minimally. From there it was dragged with ropes through the paths made by the Incas to the works themselves. Once at the construction site began to develop the wall by a first row of blocks and leaving the uncut top.

Then cut up the stones so would ‘fit’ perfectly with previous and so on. This is what allows unneeded other elements to attach a stone to another ‘.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.2.2. Empire record

One of the most puzzling aspects of this whole process has always been the transport of stone. In Ollantaytambo, Protzen found that to mobilize the quarry to the construction stone of the longest (100 tons) 1,800 people who ‘sound like much, but it is not needed, especially when compared with the drawings found in Egyptian tombs and Assyrian temples where similar scenes illustrating transport ‘. To cover this journey, covering about 8 km were used three days.

This reveals something amazing: the empire lasted less than a century and record that time we know the whole development was achieved.

It is worth noting that the Inca culture not reached its peak until about a hundred years before the Spanish conquest in 1532. In less than a century Inca society grew from a small agricultural state from central Peru to become a mighty empire that stretched from Chile to Ecuador. The basis of its cultural flowering was his ambitious building program started by Pachacutec, the ninth Inca, in 1438. Temples, palaces and warehouses tanker began to flourish everywhere.

Although this was not the basis of his research, Protzen explains that it was also clear that the Incas had some kind of mathematical knowledge or at least geometric, but has not figured out what ‘when Ollantaytambo is investigated, one notices that apples are scattered in exactly equal and parallel ‘portions.

He was also impressed the chiaroscuro effect offering the walls under the sun, because it was thought that this was a simple aesthetic idea and is nothing but the result of the technique.

On the Inca culture there were many documents, but with the little knowledge that were impossible to understand. The answers showed some research completed the missing pieces in the puzzle.

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

10.2.3. Natural Harmony

When asked the architect how you can use this knowledge today he said it is clear that this technique can not be used again. What I think is important in Inca architecture it is its adaptation and utilization of the environment ‘in the Inca aporvecha natural topography. The average was not an obstacle, but used it for their purposes’.

This use of the environment also allowed crops have hardly occur at such high regions such as corn and pepper.

Protzen right now is doing similar research at the ruins of Tiwanaku in Bolivia, seat of a civilization that lived 600 to 700 years before the Inca. It was thought that these had taught the Incas building techniques. But he has discovered that it is a completely different type, especially in the treatment of stone construction and lace. The first results will be published in the coming months. “

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

11. Notes

( NOTE 1 ) Account Karen Muller, daughter of the remarkable Chilean anthropologist Oreste Plath, his father, in his text, he wrote the name of the Kechuca in his Quechua version Quechuca . Apparently the first definition is Aymara voice. (2)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 2 ) Notice how the name of this bird, Jakkacllopito is a sense that ends in the syllable “whistle” . Suspicious sick definition, taking into account that the traditions that are heard among the inhabitants of the Andean highlands is the grass Pito , which is also referred to by this name by Diego de Rosales when he says “this plant, small in size and that grows close to the ground, named after a bird called the Mapuche Pito because eating plant … “ In this regard, Plath matches Rosales father when in his book alludes to this plant called Pito , which names the bird eats … or branches takes to make its nest.

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( Note 3 ) Some authors are not so sure that the elusive plant that softens the stone is actually the Andean Ephedra , although the latter also has its peculiar qualities.

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 4 ) The so-called Eco highlands region is a mountainous geographic area that stretches across the Andes, from the passage of Porculla, the Peruvian north to the south of South America. This eco-friendly “floor” consists of plains and plains scattered among the high mountains, at an average altitude between 3,400 to 4,500 meters above sea level. Its climate is extremely dry, with sharp temperature changes that make a big difference between day and night -can feel a burning sun and then freezing cold in a matter of hours. Geologically it is a Andosólica region, with many volcanoes south and very rocky terrain. Through the highlands many rivers run gently sloping, the result of the melting of the snow. At this point they have been counted about 12,000 lakes and glaciers over 5000m. Puna has a very rich flora distributed in the following areas according to altitude: Central and South: pulviniformes herbs, rosette, bunched grasses (ichu), tuber Distichia , quinuales, stands, SIT. In Jalca (north of 8th South Latitude): pajonal microthermal. For its part, the wildlife is is Andean-Patagonian origin and consists of numerous species, from insects to mammals and birds . (18)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 5 ) As confirmation mentioned above, about the strange customs of this woodpecker, also observed countless times by explorers, scientists and ordinary people who claim to have seen the Pito dig their nests in the high forest and rocky walls with help from a strange unknown grass, Jeremy Flanagan, of ProAvesPerú , said in an email that the representative of the family Picidae in Peru is the Andean Flicker , “the Andean Flicker or as they say the Andean Carpenter, making their nests mostly in gaps between the stones and rocks “ . Strange, however, the omission of the name Pito in the list of common names for Colaptes rupicola in the summary table of Agualtiplano Net (see subchapter 4.2.), which does not mean that it is not known by that name, very common in the Peruvian highlands.

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 6 ) This river (19) , one of the most important in the Peruvian jungle, is formed by the confluence of the Chanchamayo and Paucartambo rivers in Junín. The source of the river Chanchamayo is in the melting of the Cordillera de Huaytapallana, east of Huancayo, in the name of Tulumayo river. On the banks of this river is located the city of La Merced. The Paucartambo River originates on the eastern flank of the Nudo de Pasco, due to the melting of the Cordillera de Huachón in Pasco. The main tributary of the Perene is called upstream Pangoa, Rio Satipo. Before its junction with the Ene, Perene through the wide valley of Alta Selva Chanchamayo, considered the main coffee and fruit center of eastern Peru.

Figure 32.jpg (28571 bytes)

Figure 32 . In this map of tourism in the province of Satipo (Junin) you can see the Perene river basin and its confluence with the river to form Ene Tambo. This is the region from which the book speaks Exploration Fawcett, where It would have been seen the mysterious plant. It is a still unexplored and impenetrable forests that are considered in Peru as a protected ecological area.

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 7 ) Information obtained from: http://www.chlorischile.cl/Linares/ ephedraceae.htm

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

( NOTE 8 ) Plaza & Janes Editores. Seventh Edition. 1977

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

12. SOURCES

( Note: Right of the hyperlinks inserted last date of opening of that website )

(1) The Ancient Walls . http://home.earthlink.net/ ~ rnisbet / frame8.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(2) softeners stones.
http://www.mundomisterioso.com/
article.php? sid = 1177
(10/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(3) Sacsayhuaman, A Photo Gallery ” http://www.geocities.com/ jqjacobs / saxsayhuaman.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(4) Web site of Machu Picchu (Cusco) http://www.machupicchuonline.com/ (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(5) Map Mapuche state. http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/ documents / graphics / maps / mapupol1.h tm (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(6) About the Mapuche: Its History and Social Organization. http://www.uchile.cl/cultura/mapa/ artesamapuche / historia.htm (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(7) Mapuche Zoology. The Enigma of bird and grass Pitiwe dissolving iron and stone.
http://www.geocities.com/auka_mapu/
documents / Ornito / pitiwe.htm
(13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top v

(8) The Secret Science of the Mapuche: Biography Aukanaw. http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/obras/ cienciasecreta/introduccion/introciencia.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(9) Mapuche Zoology. species and synonymy index numerical order 169 – 287.
http://www.geocities.com/
auka_mapu / documents /
cataloguskullin / NC / 5.html
(13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(10) Website of Oreste Plath. http://www.uchile.cl/cultura/oplath/ (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(11) Archaeological Museum of Cochabamba (Bolivia) http://www.umss.edu.bo/Sitios/Museo/ rapida_mirada / arqueologia.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(12) Waterstone of the Wild . http://www.spirasolaris.ca/waterstone.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(13) Unusual Andean Stoneworking.
http://home.earthlink.net/~rnisbet/
huacas1.html
(13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(13a) Supreme Decree No. 013-99-AG on wildlife species in danger of extinction (PDF document) http://www.inrena.gob.pe/ wildlife / ds-013.pdf (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(14) Tiwanaku: People of the Children of the Sun . http://www.geocities.com/ Area51 / 3184 / tiahua.htm (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(15) The Famine Stele . http://www.piramidologia.com/ items / 3 / 3.html (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(16) Colaptes Rupícola.
http://www.agualtiplano.net/bases/
animals / 57_prin.htm # management
(13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(17) Marcos Jiménez de la Espada. http://www.csic.es/cbic/BGH/ sword / biblio.htm (13/05/2003)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(18) Map of Peru – Puna Region. http://www.nmnh.si.edu/botany/ projects / CPD / sa / map69.htm (16/05/03)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

(19) The Perene river. http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/ Vines / 6274 / afluente.htm (29/05/03)

Back to paragraph article Back to top Back to top

13. List of Images

Fig. 1 . Coricancha or Temple of the Sun. http://www.antropologia.com.ar/ peru / corican2.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 1a . Inca wall in Cusco street. http://www.stijnvandenhoven.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/cyclo-2a1.jpg

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 1b . Sacsayhuaman. http://www.stijnvandenhoven.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/sacsay1m1.jpg

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

FIG. 2 . Typical Mapuche family in southern Patagonia (late nineteenth century) http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/ documents / gallery / adentunchillka / image11.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 2a . Mapuche Allegory of a bird Pitiwe.
http://www.geocities.com/auka_mapu/
documents / Ornito / pitiwe.htm
7

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 3 . Father Diego de Rosales. http://icarito.tercera.cl/biografias/ 1600-1810 / bios / rosales.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 4 . The highlands in Puno. http://hot.ee/esi/peruu2.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 5 . Map of Peru -. Puna Region http://www.nmnh.si.edu/botany/ projects / CPD / sa / map69.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

FIG. 6 . Bookcover of Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett.
http://hallamericanhistory.com/
index.php/Mode/product/
AsinSearch/1842124684/name/
Exploration%2520Fawcett.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

FIG. 7 . A very high “seat” … http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / huacas1.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 8 . ¿Huaca? ¿Altar? ¿Temple? http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / huacas3.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

FIG. 9 . Stairs where? http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / huacas2.html

Back to image Back to the beginning of the article Back to top v

FIG. 10 . Chair “in memoriam” http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / seat.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 11a.-11b . “Bank” http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / tmbench.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

FIG. 12 . ¿Lunar Temple? http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / three.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 13 . monoliths Ollantaytambo. http://home.earthlink.net/ % 7Ernisbet / otshrin.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 14 . Colaptes rupicola.
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/
vert / birds / flicker.jpg

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 15 . Colaptes pitius.
http://www.viarural.com.ar/viarural.com.ar/
servicios/turismorural/san-roberto/
fauna-ars/picidae/carpintero-pitio.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 16 . Overview of the Colaptes rupicola.
http://www.agualtiplano.net/
basis / animal / management

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 17 . Andean Ephedra.
http://www.hanfmedien.com/
hanf / gfx / 0106 / 42a.jpg

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 18 . descriptive sketch of Ephedra Andina.
http://mazinger.sisib.uchile.cl/repositorio/lb/
ciencias_quimicas_y_farmaceuticas/
navasl01/cap3/pages/03.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 19 . A door to nowhere … http://www.crystalinks.com/ tiahuanaco.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 20 . map showing the location of Tiahuanaco south of Lake Titicaca. http://www.crystalinks.com/ tiahuanaco.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 21 . The semi-subterranean temple of Tiwanaku. http://www.crystalinks.com/ tiahuanaco.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 22 . Tribute to Thor Heyerdahl. http://www.playasperu.com/ articles / Heyerdahl.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 23 . The Kon Tiki Set sail from Callao (| 947) http://www.playasperu.com/ articles / Heyerdahl.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 24 . The Kon Tiki god http://www.playasperu.com/ articles / Heyerdahl.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 25 . Arthur Posnaksky. http://www.south-american-pic.com/ feat4 / atlantis.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 26 . walls and large stone blocks scattered on the ground. http://www.crystalinks.com/ preinca2.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 27 . A statue of impenetrable gaze. http://home.t-online.de/home/ w.trumpfheller / bo19.htm

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 28 . The famous Puerta del Sol . http://www.crystalinks.com/ preinca2.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 29 . Plane Tiahuanaco. http://www.crystalinks.com/ preinca2.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 30 . The Famine Stele . http://www.piramidologia.com/ items / 3 / 3.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 31 . strange impression of an object on a stone “softened” http://www.piramidologia.com/ items / 3 / 3.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top

Fig. 32 . Tourist map of the province of Satipo (Peru) with the location of Peremé river. http://satipo.20m.com/Location.html

Back to image Back to top Article Back to top
linea.gif (922 bytes)
Vivat Academia , magazine ” Reflection Group at the University of Alcalá “(crane) . EDITOR Your questions and comments about this web to direct them vivatacademia@uah.es Copyright © 1999 Vivat Academia. ISSN: 1575-2844. Previous issues. V. Year Last update: 24-06-2003

 

Our world is old. Much older than we are taught. There are always new mysteries to discover.  New ways to think about this Earth. New histories to write.

In this regard I noticed a photo of a cave discovered in 1992 in China. I did not travel to China to see these caves myself. However since I had recently seen the construction of the Unfinished Obelisk in Aswan Egypt I noticed the similarity in these caves construction. The tool used in these ancient places seems to leave ridge like even marks. Here are some pictures I took from the internet.

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.43.05 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.43.18 PM

I looked up the caves description in Wikipedia. It was very interesting….

“The Longyou Caves are a series of large artificial caverns located at Phoenix Hill, near the village of Shiyan Beicun on the Lan River in Longyou County, Quzhou prefecture, Zhejiang province, China.” First discovered in 1992, 24 caves have been found to date. They have maintained their structural integrity and appear not to interconnect with each other.”

Carved in siltstone, a homogeneous medium-hard rock, the caves are thought to date to a period prior the Qin Dynasty in 212 BCE. I suspect they are much much much older.

One fact from Wikipedia was curious. “Despite their size and the effort involved in creating them, so far no trace of their construction or even their existence has been located in the historic record.” Hummmmm……

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.44.45 PM

The average floor area of each cave is over 1000 square metres, with heights of up to 30 metres. The total area covered is in excess 30,000 metres.

The caves are quite large. Where they made by giants ?

The ceiling, wall and pillar surfaces are all finished the same way. A series of parallel bands between ridge marks. They are about 60 cm wide containing parallel chisel marks set at an angle of about 60°.

Does this remind you of the pictures I took at the Aswan quarry ?

20130421_103949

20130421_102541

Screen Shot 2014-05-25 at 12.18.20 PM

Can you see the similarity in the marks left in the Longyou Caves below ? The caves were not exposed to the elements as the granite in the quarry. I suggest this is why the ridges are so pronounced inside the caves.

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.44.26 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.45.01 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.45.27 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.45.58 PM

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.46.26 PM

Another of the cave’s mysteries is that there’s no evidence of lighting being used. As in the Serapeum at Saqqarra in Egypt, at Longyou there are no traces or remnants of lamp bases, oil plates or other lamp equipment. These lighting devices have been found in other Chinese caves.

How did they see what they were doing when excavating? How did they breathe ? The entrances are small and the caves deep, there would have been little to no natural light.

The Bazda Cave in Turkey also shows these marks.

Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 2.26.52 PM

Video of these Bazda Caves in Turkey here.

Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 2.27.20 PM

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-06-15 at 5.44.45 PM

Unfinished Obelisk in Aswan
Unfinished Obelisk in Aswan

stone1 stone2

Smaller scale in granite.

Can you see the similarity in the marks left in the Longyou Caves below ? The caves were not exposed to the elements as the granite in the quarry. I suggest this is why the ridges are so pronounced inside the caves.

 

 

cave

lou2

Another of the cave’s mysteries is that there’s no evidence of lig

bazda

The Bazda Cave in Turkey also shows these marks.

 

Stone softening / Arbusta de Jotcha / Spanish

http://www3.uah.es/vivatacademia/anteriores/n46/docencia.htm

Existe uma lenda difundida entre muitos dos povos pré-colombianos, segundo a qual os deuses haviam dado um presente aos índios nativos para que pudessem construir obras arquitetônicas colossais, tais como a fortaleza de Sacsayhuamán ou o complexo de Machu-Picchu.

 

De acordo com o padre Lira, este presente nada mais era que duas plantas com surpreendentes propriedades: A folha de Coca, capaz de anestesiar a dor e o esgotamento dos trabalhadores, que assim poderiam resistir ao gigantesco esforço físico que tão extraordinárias construções lhes exigiam. A outra planta era uma que, misturada com diversos componentes, converteria as rochas mais duras em pastas facilmente manipuláveis.

Durante quatorze anos o padre Lira estudou a lenda dos antigos povos andinos e, finalmente, conseguiu identificar o arbusto de “Jotcha” [cogita-se que seja a Ephedra andina) como sendo a planta que, uma vez mesclada e tratada com outros vegetais e determinadas sustâncias, era capaz de converter a pedra mais dura em puro barro.

“Os antigos índios dominavam a técnica da massificação – afirma o padre Lira em um de seus artigos –, amolecendo a pedra que reduziam a uma massa mole, podiam modelar com facilidade.”

O sacerdote realizou vários experimentos com o arbusto da Jotcha e chegou a conseguir que uma rocha sólida amolecesse até quase liquefazer-se. Porém, não conseguiu mais torná-la endurecida, por isso considerou seu experimento como um grande fracasso. Entretanto, apesar desse parcial fracasso, o padre Lira conseguiu demonstrar que a técnica de amolecimento das rochas é possível. Desta maneira seriam explicados os surpreendentes encaixes de algumas das colossais rochas que compõe as muralhas de Sacsayhuamán ou outras fortalezas pré-colombinas.

Ao mesmo tempo, no Egito, a milhares de quilômetros de distância, outros investigadores realizaram surpreendentes descobrimentos arqueológicos que também apontam para a realidade da técnica do amolecimento das rochas…

Fonte: [ Imagick ]


5. La Ephedra andina, una planta quebrantahuesos

Aukanaw, en su texto dedicado al enigma del pájaro Pitiwe y la hierba que disuelve el hierro y la piedra, nos recuerda la existencia de una planta –considerada medicinal por los mapuche— que crece en las sierras andinas, desde Ecuador hasta el estrecho de Magallanes. Los botánicos la llaman Ephedra andina, y es una de las sospechosas de ser la famosa y tan buscada hierba de los incas.

No en vano, por instinto, los animales la evitan, pues ya se ha visto lo que les sucede cuando la ingieren: se conoce de pequeños mamíferos como zorros y cuyes que han sucumbido con sus cuerpos hinchados y sus huesos deshechos por los jugos de las ramas y hojas. Los chamanes mapuche la aprecian mucho por sus propiedades medicinales y como elemento ritual. En Argentina la conocen también como Solupe, Sulupe, Punco punco, Suelda que suelda, Cola de caballo, Tramontana, Trasmontana, Pico de gallo o Pinko-pinko. En Perú recibe casi las mismas denominaciones que le han dado los mapuche de la Patagonia, además de otras autóctonas: Q’ero-q’ero, Cola de caballo, Condorsava, Likchanga, Pachatara, Pfinco-pfinco, Pinco-pinco, Pingo-pingo, Suelda con suelda, Suelda-suelda, Wacua…

Se trata de un arbusto densamente ramificado, ramas junciformes, de hasta 40 cm; el tallo algunas veces se yergue, otras se postra; ramas verticiladas. Hojas escamiformes, verticiladas en los nudos. Las flores son verticiladas, dioicas, inconspicuas: las femeninas muy poco protegidas por brácteas imbricadas con la escama seminífera globosa; las masculinas con 6 estambres. La semilla es arilada, “pseudobaya”, la que una vez seca semeja una núcula.

http://www3.uah.es/vivatacademia/anteriores/n46/docencia.htm

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 


Contenido de la sección:

Los días y los hechos de junio (Benjamín Hernández Blázquez)
Las piedras de plastilina (Carlos Gamero Esparza)

INTRODUCCIÓN
1. La Jotcha del padre Lira

1.2. La “gente de la tierra”

1.2.1. La planta maravillosa
2. Tras las huellas de los ablandadores de piedras

2.1. Exploración Fawcett 1
2.2. Exploración Fawcett 2
3. Esas extrañas piedras…
4. ¿Colaptes rupícola o Colaptes pitius?

4.1. Dos aves y un misterio
4.2. Rara avis…
5. La Ephedra andina, una planta quebrantahuesos
6. El enigma del Collao

6.1. La metrópoli del tiempo perdido
6.2. “Remaches” prehispánicos
7. Otras hipótesis: la cuestión egipcia

7.1. El dios Jnum da clases de química
8. Para saber más…
9. ¿Sabía Usted que…
10. Epílogo: Dos puntos de vista…

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban los incas sus construcciones?

10.1.1. La hipótesis de la “Piedra Blanda”
10.1.2. El “imposible” contorno de las piedras
10.1.3. Cómo prefabricaban los bloques
10.1.4. La construcción del muro
10.2. Las piedras incas pierden su misterio

10.2.1. “El loco de la cantera”
10.2.2. Imperio récord
10.2.3. Armonía natural
11. Notas
12. FUENTES
13. Lista de Imágenes

Los días y los hechos de junio

Benjamín Hernández Blázquez. Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

Con el eclipse de sol anular que acaeció el día 31de mayo, invisible en la península Ibérica, se volatizaron los días del denominado “mes más largo del año”. Junio no se considera prolongación de mayo, al menos en sus inicios ya que suele ocurrir un ligero descenso de las temperaturas, considerado benigno. Es conocido como el “frío de la oveja”; “junio para todos es bendito si se presenta fresquito”, aunque a veces se traduce esta bajada térmica, en lluvias temporales, con matiz contrario: “lluvias a primeros de junio, infortunio”.

Con todo, junio no olvida su vocación de calor, el tercero en intensidad media, y se encamina hacia la entrega de sus días al verano, será a las 19 horas y 10 minutos del día 21, sábado. Secularmente es referido como el más polimorfo del calendario: es el mes de los suicidios, del heno, de los exámenes, de los santos apostólicos, y como dedicado a la diosa Juno, protectora de la mujer, de la maternidad, los matrimonios y los nacimientos. Por lo que atañe a Castilla y León fechas significativas de su inventario, los días 24 y 29, san Juan y san Pedro, servirán de referencia para realizar determinados cultivos y faenas agrícolas e incluso para explicar ciertos comportamientos inducidos por el calor: “por san Juan duermen todos los que en su casa están”.

Desde tiempos medievales, existían prácticas domésticas y agropecuarias generalizadas que se hacen, de una u otra forma en el denominado “intervalo apostólico” los días del 24 al 29. Sucesos o hechos como mudar de amo o de mozo, de gañán de pastor; arriendo de pastos, o cobro del común, entre muchos, que en la actualidad están en muerte aparente cuando no real; como los urdidores, latoneros, talabarteros o alcabaleros que estos días referían en sus tratos, siempre carentes de albaceas sin más testigos que la palabra o un raído papel. Algunos pensaban que la elemental caída de las hojas del calendario haría progresar la historia hacia delante, también otros quienes, a la vista de esa “ristra” de días sólo sentían desaliento. Empero el lugareño, tal vez como ahora, es más clásico y se dice que ya se verá lo que acontece, ¡si hay suerte, y si el tiempo ayuda!, siempre el tiempo. Entonces se pone al tajo, aunque haga calor, y planifica a la par que cumple su objetivo anual.

Junio, también en la Administración Local; era significativo desde el siglo XIX, cuando prescribía que: “en los primeros días han de quedar resueltos por los síndicos todas las reclamaciones de los industriales respectivos, y ocuparse los Ayuntamientos de las que se les presenten”. También fijaban como fecha tope a san Timoteo, día 10, en lo concerniente a “la matrícula de los contribuyentes por carruajes y caballerías”. Para actualizar las listas, también electorales, se nombraban “dos concejales y dos mayores”.

Asimismo, en este “anfibio” mes, en capitales de provincia y ciudades castellanas se cerraba el ejercicio. El presupuesto municipal con el arqueo ordinario y simultáneamente empezaba el trimestre de prórroga para la recaudación de alcabalas y otros impuestos pendientes de cobro. Por san Pedro verificaban el balance general de ingresos y gastos del mismo ejercicio, a la vez que “se cierra la cuenta en los libros de entrada y salidas del Pósito, pasando al periodo siguiente las existencias que resulten en las paneras y en el arca”.

De cualquier manera, la versatilidad de este mes de primavera y de verano le hacia proclive a figurar en lugar destacado en el denominado calendario zaragozano publicado por primera vez en 1840 y de cuyas predicciones, pese a sus indisimulables fracasos, se fiaron millones de personas de la postguerra porque, aunque funcionando según la lógica errática y el pensar ambiguo e indefinido que propugnaba, nunca se alejaba de los principios filosóficos, tales como que en verano hace casi siempre calor y, en primavera calor y frío en general. Incluso para la irregular meteorología de este mes, no hay nada como el clasicismo, porque los servicios meteorológicos de los medios de comunicación, han desplazado todo otro interés hacia lo que se gesta en los cielos y tierra, desplazando de la mente y de la imaginación humana fábulas y mitos.

Volver al principio del artículo            Volver al principio

Las piedras de plastilina

Carlos Gamero Esparza. Diario OJO. Lima (Perú)

Un viejo enigma arqueológico que tiene de cabeza a los científicos… ¿cómo consiguieron pueblos ancestrales como los incas encajar ciclópeos bloques pétreos en sus monumentales construcciones, con perfección insuperable? ¿Acaso eran artificiales, los prefabricaban o… como dicen algunas leyendas, conocieron una técnica secreta para “ablandarlas” y acomodarlas a voluntad, como si fueran de barro?

“A Hiram Bingham le contaron sobre la existencia de una planta con cuyos jugos los incas ablandaron las piedras para que pudieran encajar perfectamente. Hay registros oficiales sobre esta planta, que incluye a los primeros Cronistas españoles. Después comprobaría tal versión: Un día, mientras acampaba por un río rocoso, él observó un pájaro parado sobre una roca que tenía una hoja en su pico, vio como el ave depositó la hoja sobre la piedra y la picoteó. El pájaro volvió al día siguiente. Para entonces se había formado una concavidad donde antes estaba la hoja. Con este método, el ave creó una “taza” para coger y beber las aguas que salpicaban del río. Teniendo en cuenta el hecho de que el liquen ablanda la piedra para atar sus raíces bajo tierra, y quizás considerando la extinción continuada de especies de esta planta, esta noción no es más que improbable”. Richard Nisbet (1)

Índice:

INTRODUCCIÓN
1. La Jotcha del padre Lira

1.2. La “gente de la tierra”

1.2.1. La planta maravillosa
2. Tras las huellas de los ablandadores de piedras

2.1. Exploración Fawcett 1
2.2. Exploración Fawcett 2
3. Esas extrañas piedras…
4. ¿Colaptes rupícola o Colaptes pitius?

4.1. Dos aves y un misterio
4.2. Rara avis…
5. La Ephedra andina, una planta quebrantahuesos
6. El enigma del Collao

6.1. La metrópoli del tiempo perdido
6.2. “Remaches” prehispánicos
7. Otras hipótesis: la cuestión egipcia

7.1. El dios Jnum da clases de química
8. Para saber más…
9. ¿Sabía Usted que…
10. Epílogo: Dos puntos de vista…

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban los incas sus construcciones?

10.1.1. La hipótesis de la “Piedra Blanda”
10.1.2. El “imposible” contorno de las piedras
10.1.3. Cómo prefabricaban los bloques
10.1.4. La construcción del muro
10.2. Las piedras incas pierden su misterio

10.2.1. “El loco de la cantera”
10.2.2. Imperio récord
10.2.3. Armonía natural
11. Notas
12. FUENTES
13. Lista de Imágenes

INTRODUCCIÓN

Los cronistas de la primera mitad del siglo XVI estaban tan sorprendidos como los capitanes que llevaron a cabo la gesta de la conquista del Perú. No podían entender cómo era posible que entre las junturas de los primorosos muros incas del Cusco no se pudiera introducir ni el filo de una navaja. No podían entender cómo fueron colocados en su sitio las colosales piedras talladas de Sacsayhuaman, para muchos fortaleza militar, para otros un complejo sagrado, y para los demás… un gigantesco observatorio celeste… o un enigma del tamaño de su portento; y les quedó la duda y la perplejidad cuando entraron en el Coricancha, la sede sacra de la divinidad solar incaica, donde, alucinados, no tanto por el oro que encontraron sus paisanos, sino por la perfección de sus formas arquitectónicas, llegaron a comparar al Cusco con Roma o Jerusalén. ¡Las piedras de sus muros parecían haber sido soldadas unas con otras!

En febrero de 1995 tuve la alegría de viajar al Cusco, después de muchos años, por fin tuve esa oportunidad. Mi hotel estaba en el centro histórico de la ciudad, muy cerca de la Plaza de Armas o Plaza Mayor, lo que los incas llamaron Huacaypata. Casualmente, detrás del hospedaje donde estaba alojado, en plena avenida El Sol, se encontraba uno de los lugares más emblemáticos de la antigua capital de los incas, la iglesia de Santo Domingo. Mis pasos, entonces, me llevaron hasta allá, hasta el Coricancha, el mítico Templo del Sol, cuyo nombre en quechua significa “cerco de oro”, el hogar del Inti, la principal divinidad del incario. Aquí los guías explican a los turistas que los españoles utilizaron incluso dinamita en su intento de derribar unos muros pétreos que ni los terremotos han podido tirar al suelo.

Figura 1.jpg (13795 bytes)

Figura 1. Un amanecer en el Templo del Sol. Los rayos del astro rey se cuelan realzando la belleza de este recinto sagrado, un rincón del mítico Coricancha.
Foto de Lizardo Távera – del portal argentino Antropología.

A pesar de las inclemencias del tiempo y de los hombres, estos hermosos lienzos de andesita blanca, azul y rojiza han sobrevivido ante el pasmo y el asombro de propios y extraños. “Los expertos no saben cómo fueron levantados, pero estos muros almohadillados, parecen todos de una sola pieza”, explican. Y no es para menos… los guías turísticos engatusan a los visitantes con la grandeza del imperio de los incas, pero no saben explicar cómo es que fue construido este templo, como tantos otros monumentos del antiguo Perú y del mundo.

Desde entonces, no me abandonó la inquietud por el misterio de las piedras incas.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

1. La Jotcha del padre Lira

Desde hace siglos, la habilidad del hombre andino para tallar la piedra y levantar muros capaces de resistir eternamente ha permanecido cubierta por la bruma del mito. La ciencia, en su afán por resolver el enigma, se ha ido prácticamente de cabeza contra los muros incas, y la arqueología tradicional, esa que no admite consideraciones que vayan mas allá de sus estrechos dogmas establecidos, ha sufrido la peor parte, y no ha tenido mejor idea que recurrir al manoseado argumento de que las piedras eran talladas a pico, a cincel y a martillazos, porque no concibe que el antiguo peruano haya conocido otra tecnología que no sea el arco y la flecha.

La arqueología clásica iberoamericana se vio sacudida en 1983, cuando la cadena española RTVE emitió el documental televisivo El Otro Perú, como parte de la serie emitida por el conocido psiquiatra e investigador Jiménez del Oso. En dicho programa se daba cuenta de uno de los más grandes enigmas del Perú antiguo y en el que el autor entrevistó a un insólito personaje: el padre Jorge Lira.

Cuenta el periodista español Juanjo Pérez (2), que el padre Lira, un sacerdote peruano ya fallecido, era uno de los mayores expertos en folclore andino, fue autor de infinidad de libros y artículos y, sobre todo, del primer diccionario del quechua al castellano. El mencionado personaje vivía en un pueblito cercano al Cusco y hasta allá se dirigió Jiménez del Oso, para entrevistarlo sobre una inquietante afirmación: el padrecito afirmaba haber descubierto el secreto mejor guardado de los incas: una sustancia de origen vegetal capaz de ablandar las piedras.

Pero esta historia empezó mucho antes. Las leyendas de muchos pueblos precolombinos peruanos aseguran que los dioses les habían hecho dos regalos a los nativos para que pudiesen levantar colosales obras arquitectónicas como Sacsayhuaman (3) o Machu Picchu (4). Dichos regalos, según el padre Lira, habrían sido, en primer lugar, la hoja de la coca, un poderoso anestésico que permitía a los obreros resistir el dolor y el agotamiento físico –es de imaginar el esfuerzo que debió haber requerido la construcción de semejantes monumentos— y el segundo habría sido otra planta, de increíbles propiedades que, mezclada con diversos componentes, convertía las rocas más duras en una sustancia pastosa y moldeable.

Figura 1a.jpg (26229 bytes)

Figura 1a. ¿Piedras Amasadas? ¿Moldeadas? ¿Talladas? ¿Con qué técnica? Lo único cierto es que contemplar este maravilloso muro inca del Cusco suscita muchas interrogantes, como las que se hizo el padre Jorge Lira.
Foto del portal de Arqueología Rutahsa.

 

Figura 1b.jpg (38509 bytes)

Figura 1b. Enigma monumental. Ni la punta de una navaja ni un alfiler pueden penetrar entre las junturas de estas moles de Sacsayhuaman (Cusco). La figura humana se empequeñece ante unas piedras ciclópeas talladas que pueden llegar a pesar cientos de toneladas.
Foto del portal de Arqueología Rutahsa.

“Durante catorce años –escribe Juanjo Pérez— el padre Lira estudió la leyenda de los antiguos andinos y, finalmente, consiguió identificar el arbusto de la jotcha como la planta que, tras ser mezclada y tratada con otros vegetales y sustancias, era capaz de convertir la piedra en barro. “Los antiguos indios dominaban la técnica de la masificación –afirma el padre Lira en uno de sus artículos—, reblandeciendo la piedra que reducían a una masa blanda que podían moldear con facilidad”.

“El sacerdote –prosigue Pérez— realizó varios experimentos con el arbusto de la jotcha y llegó a conseguir que una sólida roca se ablande hasta casi licuarse. Sin embargo, no logró volver a endurecerla, por lo que consideró su experimento como un fracaso. Pero a pesar de ese parcial fracaso, el padre Lira sí logró demostrar que la técnica del ablandamiento es posible. Así se explicarían los sorprendentes ensamblajes de algunas de las colosales rocas que componen las murallas de Sacsayhuaman u otras fortalezas precolombinas”.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

1.2. La “gente de la tierra”

Pero la resonancia de la leyenda de la hierba que ablanda la piedra parece retumbar con mucha más fuerza, curiosamente, entre los pueblos indígenas que viven aún muy al sur del Perú. Entre las regiones centrales de Argentina y Chile, del Atlántico al Pacífico, se extiende lo que alguna vez fue el territorio mapuche (5), cuyos últimos representantes han quedado confinados en alejadas comunidades en la Patagonia argentina y el sur chileno donde aún subsisten sus tradiciones. Los mapuche todavía se sienten “la gente de la tierra” (6), que es lo que quiere decir el término que los identifica en su lengua aborigen: mapu = tierra; che= gente.

Figura 2.jpg (39393 bytes)

Figura 2. Gente como uno. El pueblo mapuche supo mantener su independencia y conservó su milenaria cultura a pesar de la influencia de occidente. Esta foto, de una típica familia mapuche del sur de la Patagonia, fue tomada a fines del siglo XIX.
Imagen obtenida del portal mapuche Aukanawel.

Entre los mapuche (7) corre una extraña leyenda, esta vez la del pájaro Pitiwe, un ave de curiosas costumbres. En el portal de divulgación de la obra del notable antropólogo argentino de origen mapuche, Aukanaw (8), este autor cuenta que en su territorio habita un pájaro carpintero que guarda un profundo secreto. “Secreto –escribe Aukanaw— que celosamente comparte con los “renil” (sabios y sacerdotes mapuche): la planta que disuelve la piedra y el hierro”. A este pájaro los mapuche lo llaman P’chiu, Pitu o Pitiwe; también se le conoce por Pitio, Pito o Pitihue (9). Los aimaras del Altiplano lo llaman Yarakaka, y los quechuas: Akkakllu. Su nombre científico es Colaptus pitius, y la clasifican dentro del orden de las pisciformes, familia de las Picidae, que agrupa a unas 30 especies en Argentina, 4 en Chile y 2 en Perú, siendo una de éstas el Colaptes rupícola, una especie de pájaro carpintero adaptado a climas extremos y considerada como una variedad muy escasa y en peligro de extinción dentro del enorme contingente aviar de este país andino.

El Pitiwe es un pájaro carpintero de un tamaño similar al de una paloma, esto es, de unos 30 cm. Presenta una frente, corona y nuca de color gris pizarra; y lados de su cara y garganta de color leonado. Unas barras color café y café amarillento marcan su cuerpo por encima, mientras que por debajo, es de un blanco sucio con barras pardas. El lomo y el abdomen son de color amarillento y presenta unos ojos de iris amarillo y cola negra. Habita en los montes, bosques y matorrales; en las faldas de los cerros y campos poco arbolados, pero huye de los bosques de árboles exóticos. Su dieta está constituida por insectos que habitan en los árboles autóctonos y construye su nido en los huecos de los árboles. “Examina los troncos –escribe Aukanaw—, da varios picotazos poniendo el oído para sentir los movimientos de los insectos ocultos y si lo considera adecuado se arroja sobre su presa.”

Figura 2a.gif (6497 bytes)

Figura 2a. Alegoría mapuche de un pájaro Pitiwe.
Ilustración del portal Aukanawel.

“Es un ave trepadora –prosigue el autor— que anida desde el valle del Huasco a Llanquihue por el Pacífico, y también la región andino patagónica argentina. Su nombre mapuche, del que derivan los nombres criollos, proviene del pitido agudo que emite: Este pitido suena a los oídos mapuche claramente como:

¡Pitiwe! ¡Pitiwe!
ó
¡Pitíu-pitíu!

En septiembre, cuando es la época de celo, varios machos cortejan a una misma hembra. No luchan, sino que abren la cola en abanico y se pasean contorneándose, erizando en corona las negras plumas de la nuca. La hembra elige su preferido con un arrumaco, y los demás parten en busca de mejor suerte. “Antaño en Chile –prosigue Aukanaw—, los criollos contrataban niños espantapájaros, para que no dejaran posarse a estos pájaros en los sembrados, sobre todo cuando el trigo estaba nuevo, a pesar de que los mapuche aprecian gustosamente su carne.”

Esta avecilla no sólo alimenta las más increíbles leyendas y fantasías mágicas, sino también augurios y supersticiones, como la que asegura que si un Pitiwe se para en un árbol y canta durante tres o cuatro días seguidos, se considera anuncio de muerte para los enfermos de alguna casa vecina. En Cantín-Chiloé, otra superstición asegura que cuando grita cerca de una casa, anuncia visita de una persona que llega por primera vez. En Chile se le llama Pitiwe “a los niños pequeños y flacuchos; y “apitihuado” es sentirse con el corazón oprimido, abatido” –apunta Aukanaw.

“Entre los williche de San Juan de la Costa –nos dice Viviana Lemui— cuando el Pitiwe viene volando desde muy lejos y viene a posarse en una casa: es señal de visita que viene de lejos. También dice la gente que, cuando llega una visita de repente se asombran y le dicen:

“¿Por qué no mandaron su Pitiwe?”

Cuando el Pitiwe viene a llorar cerca de una casa es señal de que esa familia va a morir pronto, de igual manera, cuando el Pitiwe pasa llorando en la noche, frente a una casa, pronto va a morir un miembro de la familia.

En la medicina mapuche y en la popular criolla, figura como remedio su lengua. Este órgano es eficaz para que las guaguas hablen temprano y claramente, y tal fin se les da a las lenguas asadas (Cantín). También el caldo de Pitiwe es empleado como galactogogo (aumenta la secreción láctea de las madres).”

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

1.2.1. La planta maravillosa

Los mapuche dicen que el Pitiwe es un pájaro muy inteligente pero también muy discreto en torno a su relación con cierta hierba que sólo él conoce y cuyas propiedades han intrigado a la arqueología desde hace mucho tiempo. En Talagante (sur argentino) corre la volada de que, si una piedra le obstruye a un Pitiwe la entrada a su nido, que ha construido en el interior del tronco de un árbol o un hueco en una pared rocosa, éste irá a buscar una hierba y con ella frotará y destruirá la piedra disolviéndola con los jugos de la planta.

“Diego de Rosales –cuenta Aukanaw—, en su obra: “Historia General del Reyno de Chile”, describiendo las plantas medicinales mapuche, habla de una hierba llamada Pito que es de las más raras encontradas en todo el mundo y tiene gran valor medicinal. Dice que esta planta, pequeña de tamaño y que crece pegada al suelo, recibe su nombre de un pajarito que los mapuche llaman Pito porque come la planta. Los españoles le dieron el nombre de Pájaro Carpintero. La planta pulverizada disuelve el hierro.

“Algunos presos han usado esta propiedad de la planta para huir de la prisión.

“Hay otros pájaros carpinteros, que llaman: Pito, del cuerpo de un tordo: son pintados de negro, blanco y burilado y de ellos se derivó a la yerba el nombre de yerba del Pitu, porque usan más de ella que los otros pájaros.

“Tienen el pico tan fuerte, que rompen, y barrenan cualquier árbol, así para sacar y comer los gusanos, que se crían en sus entrañas, como para edificar sus nidos, abriendo una concavidad, en que se alojan con toda su familia.

“Se han hecho célebres por la yerba, que con natural instinto hallaron, para que se quebrante, y desmenuce el hierro, en que se han hecho muchas experiencias, y adquirido su conocimiento con notable maña.

“Porque advirtiendo cuando sacan sus polluelos y salen a buscarles de comer, les cierran con una plancha de hierro la puerta del nido los que quieren hacer experiencia de la virtud de la yerba del Pito, y llegando el pájaro carpintero, y hallando cerrado el nido, y que sus polluelos pían dentro, y que no puede entrar, y al punto revuelve a buscar la yerba, que llaman: pitu, y refregando con ella la plancha, la rompen, y deshacen como si fuera de papel, que es de las raras virtudes, que se conocen de yerbas, y maravilloso el instinto de este pájaro.”

Figura 3.gif (9637 bytes)

 Figura 3. El padre Diego de Rosales.
Ilustración del portal chileno Icarito.

Oreste Plath (10) en su clásico libro “El Lenguaje de los Pájaros Chilenos” anota lo siguiente:

“Botánicos analizan la planta kechuca(Nota 1), que produce un jugo que hace gelatina las piedras. Abunda allá en el Perú, Cuzco, por encima de los 4.500 metros.”

“Un dibujo en un huaco -prosigue Aukanaw-, es decir, la repetición de una ramita graficada en los cántaros de arcilla, llevó al antropólogo a descubrir que la kechuca era la rama que portaba el pájaro jakkacllopito, el que anida en pequeñas oquedades de las rocas y le da forma a su nido con esta yerba, la que con el calor del cuerpo produciría una secreción que tiene fuerza excavadora.(Nota 2)

Y hay otra planta llamada el punco-punco, (¿Pinko-pinko [Ephedra andina]?. Nota de Aukanaw)(Nota 3) a la que también se atribuye el poder de disolver piedras, que crece más arriba, a 5.000 metros. Se parece a la caña brava. Animales que la comen o la confunden con la caña brava se hinchan y sus huesos se ablandan hasta hacerse una masa amorfa.

La antropología dirá si en los grandes templos del incanato, sus gigantes piedras fueron alisadas con estas pastas o jugos que permitieron los ensambles y ajustes; y los investigadores de la botánica y de la medicina informarán qué empleo reductor, fundidor, tendrá el futuro medicamento.”

“Anotemos otras referencias interesantes:

Existen en Bolivia, en el museo (de Arqueología – N. de VA) de Cochabamba, “piedras amasadas”. Es decir, rocas generalmente graníticas, en las que los inkas podían, por simple presión, imprimir la huella de sus manos o de sus pies, como si el granito hubiese sido tan blando como la manteca. (11)

Tales improntas se encuentran en los roquedales de las montañas del Perú y también en Tahití donde, según la tradición, el dios Hiro, había puesto su pie.

En la tradición Mapuche el Mareupuantü y los werken sagrados (mensajeros) han dejado sus huellas impresas en la piedra en muchos lugares, por ejemplo en la “Piedra Santa” (paraje El Morado, dpto. Ñorkín, Neuken); en el valle del río Uco (Mendoza), etc., etc. (…)

Otro fenómeno en correlación con el precedente es el de los enormes bloques de piedra que forman las murallas de las ciudades fortificadas de los inkas, principalmente Saksawaman, cerca de Cuzco.

Estos bloques están tan sabiamente tallados y ajustados entre sí, a veces con rebordes, que se ensamblan exactamente unos en otros, lo cual hace pensar que los constructores no tallaban la piedra, sino que la trataban químicamente para poderla amasar a continuación como arcilla.

En junio de 1967 se sabía que un sacerdote católico peruano (ver capítulo 1), Jorge Lira, había descubierto el procedimiento de los inkas, que consistía en un zumo de una hierba capaz de convertir aquel duro material en sustancia maleable a voluntad.

Lira había efectuado con éxito experimentos macerando piedrecitas en el líquido extraído de la maravillosa planta, planta de la que todavía no se conoce el nombre.

En París hace ya algunos años atrás residía un mitómano, o farsante, llamado Beltrán García que empleaba el seudónimo “Gregori B.”, y decía ser descendiente de Garcilaso de la Vega y liderar la “religión del Sol Inca”. Este sujeto pasa por ser poseedor del secreto de la planta, pero con tres variedades de vegetales.

Son muy interesantes las aplicaciones que los antiguos mapuche solían darle a esta plantita, y especialmente por sus fines medicinales. La capacidad de poder ablandar temporalmente la materia ósea, tiene posibilidades insospechadas en el tratamientos de fracturas, especialmente craneanas, muy habituales en los combates precolombinos.

Un misterio que se devela deja de ser misterio y en consecuencia pierde su encanto, ya hemos dicho demasiado…

Estos secretos son amigos de los espíritus simples y a la vez son esquivos para las complicadas mentes modernas.

Por eso amigo si quieres saber más sobre esta hierba, y si tus oídos están preparados para escuchar la voz de la Ñuke Mapu (Madre Tierra), no dudes en preguntarle a su guardián, el sabio pájaro Pitiwe, y él sabrá responderte con su acostumbrada claridad:

 

 

¡Pitiwe! ¡Pitiwe!”

Y colorín, colorado… el cuento se ha acabado…

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

2. Tras las huellas de los ablandadores de piedras

En las alturas del Perú, los curtidos campesinos hablan desde hace generaciones de una misteriosa hierba nativa de este país(Nota 4) y de un pajarillo al que llaman Pito. Si bien los ornitólogos han logrado identificar a un pájaro carpintero que recibe tal denominación no sólo en Perú sino también en Bolivia y Chile, los botánicos no han tenido la misma suerte con esta enigmática planta, hasta ahora desconocida para la ciencia.

Pero los hombres del ande peruano insisten que hay una hierba de ramas y flores rojizas que crece entre la puna (5) y las selvas orientales y que era utilizada por los incas para ablandar las piedras. Según éstos, sus antepasados, grandes observadores de la naturaleza, descubrieron que el pájaro llamado Pito utilizaba la hierba del Pitu” para preparar sus nidos en las paredes rocosas, con cuya savia “derretía” las piedras y hacia agujeros redondos en los oquedales(Nota 5).

Figura 4.jpg (10080 bytes)

Figura 4. La puna en Puno. Un típico paisaje de la región altoandina. Esta foto fue tomada por una turista sueca que visitó Perú.
Foto obtenida de la Web personal Hot.ee (Suecia)
.

 

Figura 5.jpg (29355 bytes)

Figura 5. En este mapa del Perú se puede apreciar la llamada puna, el vasto territorio de altura que recorre el país de norte a sur.
Ilustración del The National Museum of Natural History (Washington)
.

Volver al principio del apartado            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

2.1. Exploración Fawcett 1

En 1954, Brian Fawcett (12), hijo menor del famoso coronel inglés Percy H. Fawcett (1867 – 1925), decidió publicar una obra de su ilustre padre, quien se perdió sin dejar rastro en las selvas del Mato Grosso (Brasil) cuando estaba buscando El Dorado. El coronel Fawcett se hizo célebre a comienzos del siglo XX por sus expediciones a las regiones más remotas de América del Sur, adonde viajaba constantemente, obsesionado por las leyendas doradas de los incas, como la del Paititi, la mítica ciudad perdida que nunca pudo alcanzar pero que estaba seguro existía.

Como producto de estos periplos amazónicos, Fawcett fundó la Royal National Geographic Society de Londres, hoy una prestigiosa organización mundial de investigación geográfica y divulgación científica, y publicó cientos de artículos de viajes y libros que reseñan sus aventuras por tierras aún inexploradas. Entre estos, su obra postrera, Exploration Fawcett, con relatos, hasta ese entonces inéditos, además de comentarios y testimonios acerca de exploraciones científicas realizadas en América del Sur, un fascinante contenido que se convirtió en un auténtico “best seller” durante los años 50 y 60.

Figura 6.jpg (5576 bytes)

Figura 6. Portada del libro donde Percy H. Fawcett cuenta sus aventuras por tierras sudamericanas, en una de sus tantas reediciones. En la tapa se puede apreciar un retrato del autor con su gorrita militar.
Ilustración de Hall American History.

En éste libro, Percy Fawcett hace un pormenorizado memorial de sus aventuras por las selvas más remotas del mundo. Sus descubrimientos lo convencieron no sólo de la existencia de civilizaciones aún desconocidas en las profundidades de la floresta amazónica, sino también de un saber perdido y del hecho de que los incas no fueron los primeros en conocer la técnica de ablandar las piedras, ni tampoco los autores de muchas maravillas arquitectónicas que salpican toda la geografía andina. De este libro se han extraído algunos párrafos que son una verdadera sorpresa.

“Los Incas heredaron las fortalezas y ciudades construidas por una raza anterior y las restauró de la ruina sin mucha dificultad –escribe convencido Fawcett, al recordar sus viajes por el Perú—. Ellos construyeron con piedra en las regiones dónde éste era el material más conveniente; en cambio, para el cinturón costero ellos usaron generalmente el adobe. Los viejos constructores adoptaron las mismas e increíbles junturas que son características de los edificios megalíticos más viejos, pero los incas no hicieron ningún esfuerzo para usar la piedra grande, previamente amasada por sus predecesores. Yo escuché que los incas heredaron esta técnica y encajaron sus piedras gracias a un líquido que ablandó las superficies a ser unidas a la consistencia de arcilla.”

“¡yo no lo creo!” – dijo un amigo que había sido miembro de la Expedición peruana de Yale que descubrió Machu Picchu en 1911—.

“Yo he visto las canteras dónde estas piedras estaban cortadas -insistió-. Yo los he visto en todas las fases de preparación, y puedo asegurarlo, las superficies fueron trabajadas a mano y nada más!”

“Pero, otro amigo mío me contó la siguiente historia:

“Hace algunos años, cuando yo estaba trabajando en el campamento minero de Cerro de Pasco (un lugar a 14.000 pies (es decir, a 4.000 metros de altitud sobre el nivel del mar. N. de VA), en los Andes del Perú Central), yo salí un domingo del campamento, con otros Gringos, para visitar algún viejo cementerio inca o Preinca, con la intención de ver si podíamos encontrar algo de valor. Tomamos la carretera a este lugar, y llevamos, claro, unas botellas de pisco y cerveza; y un peón, para que nos ayude a excavar en el cementerio.

Después de almorzar llegamos al camposanto, y el peón empezó a abrir algunas tumbas que parecían estar intactas. Trabajamos difícilmente, y aprovechábamos cada ocasión para tomar un trago. Yo no bebo, pero otros lo hicieron, sobre todo un muchacho que comenzó a beber demasiado pisco hasta emborracharse. Pero a pesar de tanto esfuerzo, sólo encontramos una vasija de barro, como de un cuarto de galón de capacidad, con un líquido espeso dentro de él.

“¡Yo apuesto la chicha!” -dijo el bebedor, totalmente fuera de sí—. “¡Lo probamos a ver qué clase de cosa bebió el inca! “

“Probablemente nos envenenemos si lo hacemos” –observó otro—.

“¡Entonces permitan que lo pruebe el peón!” -exclamó el borracho—.

Entonces rompieron el sello y sacaron el tapón de la vasija, olfatearon el contenido y llamaron al peón para que pruebe el misterioso líquido.

“Tome un trago de esta chicha” -pidió el borracho-. El peón tomó la vasija, dudó, y entonces, con el miedo pintado en su cara, lo empujó en las manos del borracho y retrocedió.

“No, no, señor” –murmuró—. “Eso no”. “¡Eso no es ninguna chicha!” -exclamó-. Entonces, el peón dio media vuelta y escapó.

El borracho puso la vasija sobre una piedra plana y corrió tras el peón. “¡Venga muchacho, agárrenlo!” –gritó—. Atrapamos al desgraciado hombre y lo llevamos a rastras de regreso; y de nuevo le exigimos que bebiera unos tragos de la vasija.

Pero el peón se enojó y en su resistencia todos forcejeamos violentamente con él, y en la pelea la vasija cayó al suelo, rompiéndose en mil pedazos. Y su contenido se derramó y formó un charco encima de la piedra plana.

Cada uno se rió. Era como un gran chiste, pero el esfuerzo de la excavación de la tumba nos había dejado exhaustos y sedientos. Y ellos fueron al saco dónde tenían guardadas las botellas de cerveza. Y comenzaron a beber.

Aproximadamente diez minutos después, yo me agaché sobre la piedra plana y por accidente examiné el charco del líquido derramado. Parecía que había más líquido derramado que antes; ¡Pero no era eso, la vasija entera dónde había estado el líquido, y la piedra bajo ella, eran tan suaves como el cemento fresco! Era como si la piedra se hubiera fundido, como la cera bajo la influencia del calor.”

Texto traducido y adaptado del libro: EXPLORATION FAWCETT, Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett (The Companion Book Club, London, 1954:317-318).

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

2.2. Exploración Fawcett II

“Buscamos en toda la Montaña peruana y boliviana un pájaro pequeño, como un martín pescador, que hace su nido en los agujeros redondos ubicados en las paredes rocosas de los acantilados del río. Estos agujeros simplemente pueden verse, pero no son fácilmente accesibles; y aunque parezca extraño, tales huecos sólo se encuentran donde los pájaros están presentes. Yo expresé mi sorpresa una vez, cuando ellos tuvieron bastante suerte en encontrar pájaros anidando en sus agujeros, que ahuecaron tan bien como si hubieran utilizado un taladro.”

“Los agujeros los hacen ellos” –Fueron las palabras de un hombre que había vivido un cuarto de siglo en los bosques—. “Yo he visto cómo ellos lo hacen –continuó contando—, durante mucho tiempo. He visto los pájaros entrar al precipicio con las hojas de alguna clase de planta en sus picos; estas aves se aferran a la piedra como lo hacen a un árbol, mientras frotan las hojas en un movimiento redondo encima de la superficie de la roca. Entonces, salieron volando y regresaron con más hojas, y continuaron con el proceso frotante. Después de tres o cuatro repeticiones, dejaron caer las hojas y empezaron a besar la piedra con sus picos afilados, y –aquí está la parte maravillosa— las aves pronto abrieron un hueco redondo en la piedra. Entonces, el ave salió otra vez de su agujero, y dejó el proceso de frotamiento varias veces antes de continuar besando. Tomó varios días, pero finalmente habían abierto los agujeros profundamente, lo bastante para contener sus nidos. ¡Yo he subido y he echado una mirada en ellos, y, créame, ¡un hombre no podría perforar un agujero tan limpiamente!”

“¿Quiere decir usted que el pico del pájaro puede penetrar la piedra sólida? ¿El pico de un pájaro “Pito” penetra en la madera sólida, no?… –pregunté sorprendido-.”

“No, yo no pienso que el pájaro puede consumir la piedra sólida –respondió el hombre—. Yo creo, como todos los que los hemos visto, creo que esos pájaros conocen una hoja que tiene un jugo que puede ablandar la piedra hasta que queda como la arcilla mojada.”

“Yo tomé esto como un gran cuento –y entonces, luego de haber escuchado historias similares en todo el país, me pareció una tradición popular—. Sin embargo, en una oportunidad, un amigo inglés de indudable confiabilidad me contó una historia que puede arrojar más luz sobre ella:

“Mi sobrino estaba en la selva baja, en el país de Chuncho, en el Río Pyrenee (Perené), al norte de Perú(Nota 6), y un día su caballo se lastimó, lo dejó junto a la chacra de un vecino, aproximadamente a cinco millas de su destino, y se fue caminando a su casa. Al día siguiente, reemprendió el caminó para recuperar su caballo y tomó un atajo a través de un bosque que nunca antes había penetrado. Él usaba sus calzones de montar a caballo desgastados, botas de montaña, y las espuelas grandes –no el tipo inglés pequeño, sino las grandes espuelas mexicanas de cuatro pulgadas de largo—, y estas espuelas eran casi nuevas. Cuando él llegó a una chacra, después de una caminata caliente y difícil a través de un arbusto espeso, su asombro fue mayúsculo cuando descubrió que “algo” se había “comido” sus hermosas espuelas, quedando estas reducidas a un punto negro de apenas una octava de pulgada. Ante el desconcierto del muchacho, el dueño de la chacra por donde estaba pasando le preguntó, entonces, si por casualidad había pisado cierta planta de un pie de alto, con las hojas rojizas oscuras. Mi sobrino recordó en seguida que él había pasado por una área ancha dónde la tierra estaba densamente cubierta con tal planta. “¡Ése es él!” – exclamó el chacarero-. “¡Eso es lo que se comió sus espuelas de lejos! ¡Ése es el material que los incas utilizaron para moldear las piedras! El jugo ablandará la roca de abajo para arriba hasta quedar como la pasta. Usted debe mostrarme donde encontró las plantas.” Cuando ellos regresaron para buscar el lugar, no pudieron encontrarlo. “No es fácil desandar los pasos en una selva dónde no existe ningún sendero.”

Texto traducido y adaptado del libro: EXPLORATION FAWCETT, Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett (The Companion Book Club, London, 1954:105-106).

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

3. Esas extrañas piedras…

El investigador viajero canadiense Richard Nisbet (13), que estuvo una larga temporada en la región de Cusco y Puno, realizó una concienzuda indagación sobre este misterio. Embrujado por la leyenda y la agreste geografía de esta región del sur peruano, comenzó a recoger diversos testimonios sobre la existencia de una técnica utilizada por los incas para ablandar las piedras. Su compañero de viaje, Kurt Bennett, tomó una serie de fotografías realmente impactantes que dan pie al asombro y la polémica. Las imágenes de algunas de ellas –y sus leyendas— hablan por si solas.

Figura 7.jpg (37516 bytes)

Figura 7. Un “asiento” muy alto…
Foto: Kurt Bennett.

“¿Cuáles de estas tallas de piedra, que parecen no tener ningún propósito, pueden servir de algo? Los pasos y peldaños que no van a ninguna parte, los asientos donde nadie se puede sentar. Deben ser encontradas en abundancia asombrosa en la zona alrededor de Cusco. Sus tallas son tan exactas, con esquinas exteriores e interiores tan agudas y finas.

¿Cómo fueron talladas?

E igualmente extraño, ¿por qué fueron talladas?”

Figura 8.jpg (37026 bytes)

Figura 8. ¿Huaca? ¿Altar? ¿Templo?
Foto: Kurt Bennett.

“La mayor parte de las historias que nos hablan de las huacas cusqueñas proviene del sacerdote Bernabé Cobo, el jesuita que escribió de ellos muchos años después de la Conquista. Cada uno de estos lugares recibió la asistencia de una familia. Cada dacha había prescrito los sacrificios que se harán en días especiales. La mayoría de los sacrificios no eran humanos, pero Cobo denunció que en 32 de estos lugares requirieron sacrificio humano, generalmente de niños. Esto es cuestionado por muchos que ven en su estadística una racionalización para la Conquista, que era, después de todo, una excusa para traer una religión verdadera a los nativos.”

Figura 9.jpg (35903 bytes)

Figura 9. Escaleras a la nada.
Foto: Kurt Bennett.

“Como fueron talladas es un misterio. El arte se pierde, quizá porque su uso se perdió antes de la Conquista. Porque es “otra materia”. De nada sirve encontrar la respuesta en la rígida y compleja religión de los incas. La mayoría de estas tallas extrañas son lugares sagrados llamados Huacas.

Había unas 333 huacas en y alrededor de Cusco (lugares considerados sagrados que podían ser un manantial, una roca, un árbol o un edificio. N. de VA). Fueron situados a lo largo de 40 líneas imaginarias o “ceques”, que irradiaban como ruedas de un carro en el Coricancha, el templo del Sol, en Cusco.”

Figura 10.jpg (45453 bytes)

Figura 10. Silla “in memoriam”.
Foto: Kurt Bennett.

“No todas estas tallas eran parte de la religión oficial inca. Algunas eran personales, familiares. Si un pariente amó sentarse en una roca particular mientras estaba vivo, su familia pudo tallar un asiento allí como monumento.

Eso no lo hace él, “como ese”, resulta más obvio.

De hecho, no tienen al parecer una idea de cómo hacerlo más.”

Figura 11a.jpg (41278 bytes)

 

Figura 11b.jpg (38211 bytes)

Figuras 11a — 11b. “Banco”.
Fotos: Kurt Bennet.

“Dos medidas con cinta métrica cerca del “banco”. Nótese los bordes redondeados y el aspecto general del envejecimiento de la piedra. Algunos piensan que la talla fue realizada antes del glaciar pasado que lo “talló” hace millares de años.”

Figura 12.jpg (36804 bytes)

Figura 12. ¿Templo lunar?
Foto: Kurt Bennet.

“No lejos de Cusco, hay una colina que llaman “el Templo de la Luna”. La colina tiene varias cuevas y muchas tallas oscilantes. Algunas de las tallas aquí demuestran desgaste por la extrema acción atmosférica.

Nótese la barra horizontal cerca del centro de la fotografía. Por la carencia de una palabra mejor, la llamaremos un “banco”.

Figura 13.jpg (24909 bytes)

Figura 13. Monolitos de Ollantaytambo.
Foto: Kurt Bennett.

“Ollantaytambo es, sino único, raro en Perú. Los monolitos gigantescos que usted ve aquí son parte de lo que debió ser un lugar sagrado o templo. En un tiempo desconocido y por razones desconocidas, el trabajo fue misteriosamente parado en este proyecto enorme.”

Texto traducido y adaptado de: Unusual Andean Stoneworking (13)

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

4. ¿Colaptes rupícola o Colaptes pitius?

En nuestra búsqueda de información sobre el enigma del pájaro carpintero misterioso tuvimos una aparente confusión de nombres y definiciones respecto a la identidad del supuesto pajarillo de la leyenda. Para poder zanjar esta cuestión decidimos contrastar la información obtenida de diversas fuentes, empezando por la versión de Aukanaw (ver subcapítulo 1.2.), donde este autor describe al Pitiwe, nombre vulgar del Colaptes pitius. Este pájaro carpintero, como ya se vio, también anida en Chile con igual nombre científico que en Argentina. En ambos países, esta variedad de ave recibe prácticamente las mismas denominaciones comunes con algunas variantes (P’chiu, Pitiu y Pitiwe en la lengua mapuche, y Pitihue y Pitio, en la lengua española). Lo singular del caso es que, paralelamente, otro pájaro carpintero, habitante de las punas y estribaciones orientales de los Andes peruanos y que también vive en Ecuador, parte de Bolivia e incluso en el norte de Chile, es llamado Pitio del Norte en tierras chilenas, mientras que en el Perú es el ya mencionado Pito o Pitu.

En Chile, este Pitio del Norte o Carpintero Andino también recibe las denominaciones de Pitihue, Pitigüe, Pitio y Yacoyaco, en tanto que en Perú lo llaman, además de Pito o Pitu, Acajllo, Jacajllo, Yactu y Yarakaka -los tres últimos nombres son propios de la región de Puno-. Y cuando entran a Chile, pasan a tener los nombres arriba citados, en especial Pitio del Norte y Pitihue, siendo este último uno de los nombres más corrientes que también recibe el Colaptes pitius de la Patagonia argentina.

Este menudo embrollo plumífero, como se puede apreciar, surgió a causa de los nombres comunes que indistintamente se les da a los representantes de ambas especies de pájaros carpinteros tanto en Argentina y Chile como en el Perú. Pues mientras en la Patagonia argentina al Pitiwe o Colaptes pitius lo llaman también Pitihue, al Pitio o Pitio del Norte chileno, o Colaptes rupícola, igualmente se lo conoce como Pitihue. Y este Pitio del Norte es a la vez el Pito o Pitu peruano.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

4.1. Dos aves y un misterio

Entonces, ¿cuál de estas aves es el pájaro de la leyenda? La respuesta a este desaguisado ornitológico parece estar, precisamente allí, en la leyenda. Y en las versiones de aquellas personas que dicen haberlo visto llevando en su pico la extraña planta para ahuecar sus nidos en las rocas y oquedales de los Andes y en las profundas gargantas de los ríos cordilleranos que se avientan ruidosos al llano amazónico.

Tanto Hiram Bingham como Brian Fawcett hablan del pájaro Pito, y éste es el nombre con el que lo conocen los lugareños de las estribaciones orientales de los Andes peruanos y de las selvas desde Cusco hasta más al norte de la zona del río Perené, e incluso se dice que ha sido visto en Puno y en Bolivia. Otras versiones recogidas por investigadores en temas de arqueología misteriosa, hablan ciertamente del pájaro Pitu que lleva en su pico las hojas de “la hierba del Pito o Pitu” que ablanda la piedra. De este modo, todos coinciden en señalar al Pito como el pajarito de la hierba secreta de los incas.

Un secreto que también parece conocer el Pitiwe, si creemos a Aukanaw. No hay que olvidar que el Pitiwe argentino es asimismo un pájaro carpintero, de hecho, un Colaptes pitius, una Picidae, por lo que -si damos crédito a lo que de él se dice-, tenemos fundadas razones para pensar que tiene algo que ver con esta increíble historia. De la misma forma, el Pito o Pitu peruano -como su homólogo, el Pitio del Norte o Pitihue chileno-, es una Colaptes rupícola por definición ornitológica, y también parece tener algo en común, y éste, con mayor razón por su presencia en los mitos peruanos. Ambas especies, pues, tienen las mismas costumbres, ambos hacen sus nidos en las rocas, y ambos, ya en el plano de la leyenda y la polémica, conocen el secreto de la planta maravillosa. Y aunque ambas especies, en definitiva, son primos hermanos, el Pito es quien parece tener la voz cantante… y la más fuerte en las leyendas de los ablandadores de piedras.

Figura 14.jpg (9524 bytes)

 Figura 14. Colaptes rupícola.
Imagen del Smithsonian Institution (Washington) 1999.

Figura 15. Colaptes pitius.
Imagen obtenida del portal Viarural
.

Figura 15.jpg (13001 bytes)

Ahora lo que faltaría es identificar plenamente la famosa plantita que ablanda la piedra, y para ello habría que preguntárselo al Pito… o al Pitiwe –que lastimosamente no pueden hablar—. La leyenda, y la polémica, pues, todavía están servidas. Mientras tanto, la Jotcha del buen padre Lira no da señales de vida, al menos no tiene todavía carta de ciudadanía científica… porque la ciencia oficial no la puede ver.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

4.2. Rara avis…

El Decreto Supremo número 013-99-AG (13a), promulgado por el Gobierno Peruano el 19 de mayo de 1999, fue la respuesta a la preocupación por aquella fauna y flora en peligro de extinción. Lo curioso de esta norma legislativa es que declara como especie muy rara a la variedad Colaptes rupícola. No cabe duda que el pajarito alguna vez tenía que llamar la atención de las autoridades para decirles que seguía chapoteando y picoteando entre los Andes y las brumosas selvas. Curioso pajarillo este, que vive envuelto por el silencio de las punas y las leyendas ancestrales que no lo dejan en paz. Como otras aves misteriosas, el pequeño Pito se ha convertido en el fetiche de su propio mito. Y también en un ave de gran interés para la ciencia como se puede apreciar en el cuadro descriptivo que sigue a continuación: (16)

figura 16.jpg (28420 bytes)

Figura 16. Cuadro sinóptico del Colaptes rupícola.
Ilustración de Agualtiplano Net.

COLAPTES RUPÍCOLA
INFORMACION GENERAL

Es un pájaro carpintero característico de las zonas altas de los Andes. Como todos los pájaros carpinteros, presenta adaptaciones especiales para poder hacer huecos en la búsqueda de su alimento, como una especialización en la perforación de troncos de árboles y maderas, mediante el pico. Tienen músculos especiales en la cabeza y el cuello, lo que hacen que no doblen el cuello con facilidad.

Hábitat

Distribución

En pastizales de puna y campos, laderas rocosas, en casas abandonadas para descansar y anidar. De 2000 – 5000 m, en Perú, Bolivia, Argentina y Chile.

ÁRBOL TAXONOMICO

Reino Animalia
Phyllum Chordata
Subphyllum Vertebrata
Superclase Gnathostomata
Clase Aves
Subclase Neornithes
Infraclase Neoaves
Parvaclase Picae
Orden Piciformes
Infraorden Picides
Familia Picidae
Género Colaptes

IDENTIFICACIÓN

Sinónimos científicos

Esta especie no tiene sinónimos científicos registrados.

Nombres comunes

Carpintero serrano (Español)
Andean flicker (Inglés)
Acajllo
jacajllo (Puno)
Llactu (Puno)
Yaracaca (Puno)
Pitio del norte (Chile; Español)
Pitihue (Chile)
yacoyaco (Chile)

DESCRIPCIÓN CIENTÍFICA

Nombre científico Colaptes rupicola
Autor D’Orbigny
Año 1840
El macho tiene la corona rojo brillante, el cuerpo es amarillento en general, la parte dorsal esta rayada de negro, la rabadilla y el vientre son de color crema hasta canela suavemente rayados o densamente moteados de negro. La cola es negra. Mide aproximadamente 37 cm.
Es un ave diurna e insectívora. Caminan dando saltos, en busca de su alimento haciendo excavaciones en la tierra con su largo pico, hasta encontrar larvas de polillas o escarabajos.Se reproduce en huecos ubicados entre las rocas, y en paredes de casas de adobe usualmente abandonadas. A veces sitúa el nido en huecos excavados en árboles de Polylepis. Pone huevos entre setiembre y octubre.


Son cautelosos pero fáciles de observar. Se reúnen en pequeños grupos en los pastizales para realizar su despliegue nupcial.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

5. La Ephedra andina, una planta quebrantahuesos

Aukanaw, en su texto dedicado al enigma del pájaro Pitiwe y la hierba que disuelve el hierro y la piedra, nos recuerda la existencia de una planta –considerada medicinal por los mapuche— que crece en las sierras andinas, desde Ecuador hasta el estrecho de Magallanes. Los botánicos la llaman Ephedra andina, y es una de las sospechosas de ser la famosa y tan buscada hierba de los incas.

No en vano, por instinto, los animales la evitan, pues ya se ha visto lo que les sucede cuando la ingieren: se conoce de pequeños mamíferos como zorros y cuyes que han sucumbido con sus cuerpos hinchados y sus huesos deshechos por los jugos de las ramas y hojas. Los chamanes mapuche la aprecian mucho por sus propiedades medicinales y como elemento ritual. En Argentina la conocen también como Solupe, Sulupe, Punco punco, Suelda que suelda, Cola de caballo, Tramontana, Trasmontana, Pico de gallo o Pinko-pinko. En Perú recibe casi las mismas denominaciones que le han dado los mapuche de la Patagonia, además de otras autóctonas: Q’ero-q’ero, Cola de caballo, Condorsava, Likchanga, Pachatara, Pfinco-pfinco, Pinco-pinco, Pingo-pingo, Suelda con suelda, Suelda-suelda, Wacua

Se trata de un arbusto densamente ramificado, ramas junciformes, de hasta 40 cm; el tallo algunas veces se yergue, otras se postra; ramas verticiladas. Hojas escamiformes, verticiladas en los nudos. Las flores son verticiladas, dioicas, inconspicuas: las femeninas muy poco protegidas por brácteas imbricadas con la escama seminífera globosa; las masculinas con 6 estambres. La semilla es arilada, “pseudobaya”, la que una vez seca semeja una núcula.

Figura 17.jpg (36817 bytes)

Figura 17. Ephedra andina en su ambiente natural.
Imagen obtenida del portal Hanfmediem.

Se utiliza como forrajero, algunos auquénidos comen sus hojas, tallos y frutos –suponemos que saben cómo hacerlo sin que los afecte—. Regular palatabilidad para el ganado ovino (Tapia y Flores 1984), los que gustan de comer las bayas (Vargas 1988). Como planta medicinal es un excelente diurético y depurador de las afecciones de la vejiga, en la curación de la piorrea, en inflamaciones de las encías (Soukup). Las plantas del género Ephedra contienen los alcaloides 1-3 efedrina y pseudoefedrina (1-1,57 %) las que se usan en terapéutica bajo las formas de sulfato y clorhidrato de efedrina, como estimulante respiratorio, especialmente para el tratamiento del asma bronquial; también como sudoríficador, antipirético y sedante de la tos; tiene acción midriática por lo que se utiliza en oftalmología para dilatar la pupila (Aldava y Mostacero, 1988).

Figura 18.jpg (28487 bytes)

Figura 18. Croquis descriptivo de la Ephedra andina. A-G. Ephedra andina Poepp. Ex Meyer; A. Rama de una planta femenina (X 1); B. Estróbilo femenino (X 50); C. Fruto (X 50); D. Ramas de una planta masculina (X 1); E. Inflorescencia masculina (X 50); F. Estróbilo masculino (X 50); G. Flor masculina (X 50).
Galería de Láminas. Biblioteca Digital de la Universidad de Chile (Santiago).

Fructifica en otoño. Crece en sitios con clima semi-desértico. Vertientes occidentales y zonas interandinas, entre 1300-4500 m (Weberbauer 1945). En Yura, Pampa de Arrieros, Cañahuas, Sumbay, Vizcachani y la bajada a Chivay, 2600-4300 m.(Nota 7)

Volver al principio del apartado            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

6. El enigma del Collao

“Oh, ven Viracocha, Señor de todo el mundo
grande como el cielo, origen de todo
creador de los hombres, diez veces te saludo.
Con los ojos clavados en tierra te busco
como busco la fuente cuando siento sed
con toda la voz que tengo te llamo…”

Capac Yupanqui. Quinto Rey Inca

¿Fueron realmente primitivas las antiguas sociedades andinas que erigieron monumentos como los edificios de ciudades como Tiahuanaco? Las viejas ciudades de piedra de los Andes representan, que duda cabe, un verdadero reto para la ciencia.

¿En que otra parte del mundo se puede encontrar una ciudad de factura imposible como Tiahuanaco? ¿Y por qué en los Andes? Y es que las ruinas que se encuentran en el actual territorio boliviano, a unos 20 kilómetros al sur del lago Titicaca, verdadero mar mediterráneo, otrora sagrado para los incas, para los aimara y para los colla, el aguerrido pueblo que dio nombre a esta región, no son un simple montón de ruinas. Para comenzar, la altitud en que se encuentra esta ciudad, 4.000 m. sobre el nivel del mar, es una verdadera tortura para quienes no están acostumbrados a vivir con menos oxígeno del normal. Nadie sabe con exactitud cuándo fue construida ni cómo. Aunque los arqueólogos dicen que data de entre los años 200 a. de C y 600 de nuestra Era, lo cierto es que hay suficientes evidencias como para pensar que su hechura es mucho más vieja de lo que se cree. Los bloques que componen sus construcciones son enormes y algunos de ellos pesan cientos de toneladas. Se han encontrado las canteras de donde provienen, y están a distancias que oscilan entre los 100 y los 200 km., sin embargo, ello no resuelve el problema del cómo y el cuándo y el porqué de su transporte a distancias tan grandes y a un lugar tan inhóspito, y el misterio permanece congelado por el tiempo y la frialdad del Altiplano.

Figura 19 (copia).jpg (11924 bytes)

 Figura 19. Una puerta a la nada, esta estructura lítica parece unir este mundo con no sabemos que otro lugar…
Foto obtenida del portal Ancient and Lost Civilizations.

Figura 20. Alegoría del pasado. Mapa que señala la ubicación de Tiahuanaco al sur del lago Titicaca.
Dibujo publicado en el portal Ancient and Lost Civilizations.

Figura 20.jpg (10486 bytes)

Se presume que algunas de estas piedras fueron traídas a través del lago Titicaca durante la estación de crecida de sus aguas y cuando éstas todavía besaban los muelles de la ciudad, los mismos que aún se pueden apreciar, rodeados de tierra y piedras. Algo tuvo que suceder para que en algún momento del lejano pasado el lago se retirara 20 kilómetros al norte, al lecho donde se encuentra actualmente. Otras de estas piedras, por las dificultades técnicas que implica su transporte, tuvieron que haber venido por tierra. Se ha teorizado que tal vez se construyeron rampas lubricadas con arcilla húmeda para hacer subir las piedras por las cuestas. Se trata, pues, de un dilema tecnológico del tamaño de su misterio. Los científicos no se ponen de acuerdo, y mientras unos sostienen que si éste no fue el sistema empleado, tuvo que ser otro parecido. Se ha aventurado inclusive el trabajo forzado de miles de esclavos que habrían sudado la gota gorda para mover dichos bloques de un sitio a otro. Pero se sabe tan poco de aquella sociedad que construyó una ciudad enorme en aquellas alturas, que simplemente da pie a las más alucinantes especulaciones.

Figura 21.jpg (21977 bytes)

Figura 21. El templo semi-subterráneo de Tiahuanaco. ¿Quién se iba a imaginar a los españoles llegar a una ciudad desierta construida en medio de la frígida puna? Su sentimiento debió ser parecido al de los incas, que, un siglo antes que ellos, conquistaron la meseta del Collao. Obsérvese en la parte inferior de la imagen el intrigante muro de las cabezas clavas esculpidas; son decenas de rostros pétreos que muestran rasgos de diferentes razas, algunas desconocidas –nada indígenas— que adornan este fabuloso templo.
Foto obtenida del portal Ancient and Lost Civilizations
.

Cuando los incas llegaron a esta zona en el siglo XV, esta ciudad ya estaba abandonada desde hacia mucho tiempo. Los lugareños ni siquiera sabían como se llamaba originalmente. Una leyenda cuenta que el inca Mayta Capac, el conquistador del Collao, envió un Chasqui (mensajero) al Cusco para que diera noticia de la nueva conquista. Cuando el hombre regresó a los pocos días, el gobernante, admirado por su fortaleza física, exclamó: “¡Tiay-wanaco!”, voz compuesta que en quechua significa: “¡siéntate y descansa, guanaco!”. Y así pasó a llamarse esta ciudad desierta. En el siglo XVI, los españoles que llegaron hasta estos parajes recibieron la misma impresión: soledad y misterio. Los cronistas hispanos recuerdan las leyendas que los incas les contaron sobre el origen de esta ciudad. Éstas afirmaban que Tiahuanaco había sido construida por hombres blancos y barbudos, dirigidos por el dios Tiki Viracocha, nombre que después sirvió de inspiración a Thor Heyerdahl, quien en 1947 bautizó a su balsa como Kon-Tiki porque estaba convencido que ese mismo pueblo se había hecho a la mar en dirección al oeste, para fundar la sociedad constructora de estatuas de la isla de Pascua.

Figura 22.jpg (14860 bytes)

Figura 23.jpg (16291 bytes)

Figuras 22 y 23. El navegante de la bruma. El noruego Thor Heyerdahl, que duda cabe, trastocó por completo nuestra forma de percibir el pasado gracias a sus osadas travesías marinas y valientes teorías arqueológicas. En la siguiente imagen, la legendaria Kon Tiki zarpa del Callao para su histórico periplo a la Polinesia.
Fotos del portal PlayasPerú.

En torno a esta ciudad se han vertido las más alucinadas suposiciones. Mientras Heyerdahl pensaba que los primeros colonizadores usaban balsas, y no creía en la posibilidad de una intervención extraterrestre. Erich von Daniken, en cambio, afirmaba que los seres de cuatro dedos (¿?) cuyos rasgos aparecen grabados en algunas piedras de Tiahuanaco son retratos de antepasados que llegaron desde el espacio. Pero, con todo esto, el reto que tiene la arqueología es demostrar que las explicaciones convencionales son factibles. Se ha sugerido, incluso, organizar el transporte de un bloque tallado de 100 toneladas por un terreno irregular (bosques y ríos incluidos) desde una distancia de 160 km., cosa harto difícil para nuestras capacidades técnica. A esto se suma el hecho, más que probable, de que transportar semejantes monolitos, aunque se descubra el sistema empleado, no dará respuesta al enigma del origen de esta desconcertante ciudad de piedra.

Figura 24.gif (2657 bytes)

Figura 24. El dios Kon Tiki –¿el mismo Tiki Viracocha?—, que inspiró a Thor Heyerdahl su aventura marina. Obsérvese la barba que lleva este personaje.
Ilustración del portal PlayasPeru.
Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

6.1. La metrópoli del tiempo perdido

Recorrer estas ruinas es enfrentarse con un pasado incomprensible. A comienzos del siglo XX, las ruinas fueron sometidas a un expolio sistemático por parte de lugareños de la zona, lo que llamó la atención de Arthur Posnansky (14), arqueólogo de la Universidad de La Paz, quien logró detener los saqueos y comenzó a investigar el pasado de Tiahuanaco. En su libro: Tiahuanaco, la cuna del hombre americano, cree que la última civilización de Tiahuanaco apareció unos 14.000 años antes de C. y que en algún lejano momento se produjo un fenómeno geológico de proporciones dantescas que fraccionó la cordillera de los Andes. Posteriormente, según este mismo autor, se produjo una elevación de la región del lago Titicaca hace unos diez mil años tras un hundimiento de amplias regiones de tierra (Mu, Atlántida).

Se trata de una postura que, ciertamente, muchos especialistas se niegan a aceptar, aunque éstos tampoco encuentran respuestas a muchos de los misterios que plantean estas construcciones pétreas, como, por ejemplo, la ya mencionada presencia de los rostros esculpidos de diferentes razas en el mural del templo semi-subterráneo. Por otro lado, muy pocos explican el porqué, coincidentemente con la teoría lanzada por Posnansky, se han encontrado conchas de moluscos petrificados y fósiles de animales marinos en los alrededores de la meseta del Collao -algo que se repite por toda la geografía andina-, además de restos de lo que pudieron haber sido playas o litorales marinos a más de 4.000 metros de altitud en la meseta del Collao.

Figura 25.jpg (2363 bytes)

Figuras 25 y 26. El Arqueólogo Arthur Posnansky tuvo el mérito de salvar lo que quedaba de Tiahuanaco. En la otra foto, los muros y bloques pétreos tirados por el suelo dan una idea de la grandeza de esta ciudad.
Imágenes de los portales South American Pic y Crystalink.

Figura 26.jpg (20656 bytes)

Pero fuera de conjeturas, para nadie es un secreto el asombro que causan las enormes construcciones de esta ciudad, verdaderos rastros de una tecnología inexplicable. Aquí todo es gigantesco, hasta las escaleras. Las piedras son muestra de un arte lítico sin parangón en ninguna otra parte del mundo. Una de las estatuas, por ejemplo, es un bloque tallado de una sola pieza que tiene más de siete metros de altura y pesa unas 10 toneladas, mientras que otra piedra, de casi nueve toneladas, es un monolito de tres metros de altura, que tiene unas desconcertantes muestras esculpidas en sus seis caras. Son docenas de estatuas de mirada impasible que parecen burlarse de la lógica y del tiempo…, y de las más extravagantes teorías, habida en cuenta de que la cantera más cercana a Tiahuanaco está a más de 100 Kilómetros de distancia, y los arqueólogos se rompen el coco por saber cómo es que aparecieron allí.

De igual modo sorprenden también sus pórticos -puertas por donde sopla la brisa gélida de la puna desolada, entradas mágicas por donde se cuelan las estrellas de las noches infinitas-, como la célebre Puerta del Sol, increíble monolito de 3 metros de altura, 4 de anchura, medio metro de grosor, y tallado en una sola piedra; en esta estructura maciza, la puerta y las falsas ventanas han sido cortadas con el cincel, y las esculturas del friso -que aparece coronado por el altorrelieve de un ignoto personaje flanqueado por una serie de figuras talladas a ambos lados, que algunos han visto como una escritura desconocida o un misterioso “calendario venusino”- están esculpidas en la misma roca y su peso es de más de 10 toneladas. Otra estatua, de una sola pieza, tiene 8 metros de alto, 1 de espesor y pesa 20 toneladas. Pero esto no es nada comparado con aquellos bloques que se resisten a la lógica.

Figura 27.jpg (7324 bytes)

Figuras 27 y 28. Una estatua de impenetrable mirada. Nadie sabe cuando dejó de ser una columna de alguna sala enorme o si representa a alguno de aquellos hombres blancos de la leyenda, pero lo cierto es que desde hace siglos contempla el horizonte. En la otra foto, la maravillosa Puerta del Sol parece el ingreso mágico a lo desconocido.
Imágenes obtenidas de los portales de arqueología trumpfheller/bo19.htm y Crystalinks.

Figura 28.jpg (27659 bytes)

El cronista de origen luso, Diego de Alcobaza, que visitó Tiahuanaco poco después de la Conquista española, escribió: “entre los edificios de Tiahuanaco a orillas del lago existe una plaza de 24 metros cuadrados, tiene adosada a uno de sus lados una sala de 14 metros de longitud. Tanto la sala como la plaza están formadas de una sola pieza. Una verdadera obra maestra tallada en la roca… hay también muchas estatuas de hombres y mujeres, los cuales son de rasgos tan perfectos que parecen vivos”.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

6.2. “Remaches” prehispánicos

Por su parte, el naturalista español Marcos Jiménez de la Espada (17), quien estuvo en el Altiplano peruano – boliviano a fines del siglo XIX-, anotó que uno de los edificios de la ciudad es una de las maravillas del mundo. Grandes bloques de piedra de 37 pies de largo por 15 de ancho, estaban unidos sin cal ni mortero, con precisión tal que sus límites apenas se advertían a simple vista. Otra singularidad de esta ciudad convierte a los antiguos pobladores de Tihuanaco en verdaderos genios de la fontanería y de la ingeniería hidráulica. La ciudad disponía de una complicada red de traída y recogida de aguas por la que se abastecía de agua fresca de las alturas, y disponía de otras canalizaciones que se supone servían para regar jardines.

También se han encontrado huellas de una metalurgia muy avanzada. Fundían el cobre puro con el que fabricaban clavos y grapas para sujetar los bloques de las construcciones, lo que hoy llamaríamos remaches, cosa que no se ha visto en ninguna parte de los Andes. Notable fue también su habilidad en el pulido y bruñido del metal, la fundición de molde perdido, la soldadura y el plateado, además del martilleo y el repujado. Todo lo que se encontró en Tiahuanaco y lo que se conserva en museos, prueba plenamente que esta gigantesca ciudad fue crisol de civilizaciones.

Figura 29.jpg (15897 bytes)

Figura 29. Plano de Tiahuanaco.
Imagen obtenida del portal Crystalinks.

Hay investigadores que han querido darle a Tiahuanaco dimensiones cósmicas y tratan de explicar el enigma de sus piedras. Es el caso de Louis Pawels y Jaques Bergier, los desaparecidos autores de El Retorno de los Brujos,(Nota 8) quienes citan al historiador estadounidense A. Hyatt Verrill, quien dedicó 30 años de su vida a estudiar las civilizaciones desaparecidas de la América Central y del Sur, que escribe: “la altiplanicie de Bolivia y del Perú evoca otro planeta… aquello no es la Tierra, es Marte. La presión del oxígeno es allí la mitad de la del nivel del mar. Algunas precisiones recientes se inclinan a pensar que allí vivían hombres hace treinta mil años. Seres humanos que sabían trabajar los metales, que tenían observatorios y poseían una ciencia que les capacitaba para efectuar obras que son casi imposibles con los medios actuales; algunas de las obras de irrigación serían a duras penas realizables con nuestras perforadoras eléctricas. Y ¿porqué unos hombres que no utilizaban la rueda construyeron grandes carreteras pavimentadas?. Creo que los grandes trabajos de los antiguos no fueron realizados con útiles de tallar piedra, sino con una pasta radioactiva”.

Los viejos aimara y los Uros del Titicaca todavía recuerdan a los dioses blancos que un día vinieron para enseñar civilización y luego se marcharon con la promesa de regresar. Desde entonces ellos pasaron a ocupar el panteón de sus relatos más fantásticos. Para las leyendas, los dioses eran blancos, altos, rubios, con barba y ojos azules, y construyeron la ciudad más vieja de América y tal vez del mundo.

Y cuando el curtido pastor de llamas observa el cielo y siente la llegada del viento y la lluvia que anuncian el fin de la estación seca, evoca al creador de su mudo andino, y exclama… ¡viene Viracocha!

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

7. Otras hipótesis: la cuestión egipcia

Volviendo con los ablandadores de piedras (ver capítulo I), Juanjo Pérez sigue detallando los pormenores de esta increíble técnica de la antigüedad que, parece, tuvo alcance global. El doctor Joseph Davidovits –un famoso investigador afincado en París, autor de unos estudios sobre materiales geopliméricos, considerados entre los más revolucionarios para la industria desde la invención de los plásticos—, conjuntamente con Marguie Morris, publicó en 1988 el libro The Pyramids: An Enigma Solved (Dorset Press, Nueva York, 1988). Este libro se ha convertido en una obra fundamental para comprender el misterio del reblandecimiento pétreo en el antiguo Egipto. “En ella –explica Pérez— Davidovits expone numerosos ejemplos de construcciones de los faraones egipcios realizadas reblandeciendo la piedra, modelándola y posteriormente volviéndola a endurecer una vez era colocada en su emplazamiento definitivo. Más aún, el doctor Davidovits muestra análisis microscópicos y de rayos X de piedras en cuyo interior han sido descubiertos cabellos, bolsas de aire, fibras textiles, etc.”

Cabellos, bolsas de aire, fibras textiles cuando supuestamente los bloques de la Gran Pirámide son naturales. Nos preguntamos, de la misma manera que el autor de la nota y con sus sorprendidas palabras: “¿Cómo es posible que en las piedras utilizadas para la construcción de la Gran Pirámide de Keops se encuentren cabellos humanos? ¿Cómo llegaron restos de fibras y tejidos al interior de esas rocas sólidas procedentes de la arquitectura faraónica? Para el investigador Manuel Delgado la explicación es sencilla y apunta a que los antiguos egipcios sabían cómo convertir la roca más dura en una pastosa masa que, durante su manipulación, podría recoger restos de materiales o formar grumos, al igual que ocurre con la masa del pan o del dulce mientras es manipulada por los reposteros.

“Lo cierto –prosigue Pérez— es que los restos microscópicos que Davidovits ha encontrado en el interior de más de 20 rocas de esa época histórica parecen demostrar la existencia de dicha técnica. Pero existen otros muchos indicios que lo corroboran, como las hendiduras artificiales de ciertos monumentos o los emplastes añadidos a algunas construcciones, mastabas e incluso pirámides. Como si un alfarero corrigiese algún error en su obra, añadiendo trozos de barro sobre los defectos, así aparecen algunos trozos de roca ’incrustados” en huecos o aparentes fallos en ciertas necrópolis o monumentos faraónicos.”

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

7.1. El dios Jnum da clases de química

¿Cómo lo hacían? Tal como ha ocurrido con otros enigmas arqueológicos del pasado, la “fórmula secreta” para ablandar las piedras, la técnica que “derretía” las rocas más duras, según Davidovits y Manuel Delgado, parece estar en la llamada estela de Famine (15). Esta sorprendente escritura es en realidad un relieve formado por más de 2.600 jeroglíficos repartidos en 32 columnas, donde se describen las fórmulas dictadas por el dios Jnum al faraón Zosher, quien levantó para su eterno descanso la famosa pirámide escalonada de Sakkara.

La inscripción, descubierta en 1889 por Charles Wilbour en la isla de Sehel, a tres kilómetros de Assuan, es conocida también como la Estela Química de Jnum. “La razón de tan insólito nombre –explica Pérez- es muy sencilla: en ella, según Davidovits, se encuentra el recetario químico para la construcción de una especie de “piedra filosofal” capaz de ablandar la roca.”

Figura 30.jpg (17419 bytes)

 Figura 30. La misteriosa Estela de Famine tiene mucho que decirle a los investigadores.
Imagen del portal Piramidologia.
   

Figura 31.jpg (10217 bytes)

Figura 31. Extraña impresión de un objeto sobre piedra “ablandada”.
Imagen del portal Piramidologia.

Al igual que el padre Jorge Lira en el Perú, Davidovits realizó experimentos de ablandamiento de la piedra basándose en los textos de la Estela de Famine. Consiguió reblandecer rocas calizas, pero, al igual que su colega peruano, tuvo problemas para volver a solidificar las piedras de forma homogénea.

Como apunta el autor del artículo, semejante técnica responde a una forma de tecnología – en este caso química– que difícilmente encaja con nuestros conocimientos del pasado. “Ya la reina Hatshepsut, cuya esfinge se conserva actualmente en Memphis, dejó escrito en el obelisco más grande del templo de Karnac que “las generaciones futuras se preguntarán sobre la técnica e izado de este gran monolito–parece que la gran faraona egipcia de hace más de 3,500 años se las sabía todas—. El secreto de dicha técnica, aplicada tanto en las construcciones inspiradas por esa soberana como en otros muchos monumentos faraónicos está, en buena medida, basado en el reblandecimiento de la piedra.

Manuel Delgado, un investigador que, además de Egipto y medio mundo, ha recorrido también buena parte del continente americano, confirma que se han encontrado evidencias de la técnica del ablandamiento pétreo en México, Perú y otros países. Las piedras ablandadas de la meseta de Nasca, de Machu-Picchu o de la Gran Pirámide parecen demostrar que en el pasado más remoto existió una ciencia tan o más avanzada que la nuestra. “Atribuir esa tecnología –concluye Delgado– a una civilización anterior como la Atlántida, o a la presencia de extraterrestres, es una cuestión de opiniones. Pero a estas alturas nadie puede negar las evidencias de que nuestra historia no es como nos la han contado…”

Ellos, los iniciados de la ciencia ignota, ablandaron las piedras. Los incas, al parecer, heredaron parte de ese conocimiento.

Pero la historia lo ha olvidado. Las piedras están allí, el misterio también.

Nadie sabe cómo lo hicieron. Nadie es capaz de encontrar la planta maravillosa. Nadie lo puede hacer, pero tampoco lo puede decir, ni siquiera el pájaro Pitiwe.

Como diría Aukanaw, para los curiosos que buscan lo cuantitativo y no lo cualitativo de las cosas, “…si quieres saber más sobre esta hierba, y si tus oídos están preparados para escuchar la voz de la Ñuke Mapu (Madre Tierra), no dudes en preguntarle a su guardián, el sabio pájaro Pitiwe, y él sabrá responderte con su acostumbrada claridad:

¡Pitiwe! ¡Pitiwe!”

Eso es todo…

Volver al principio del apartado Volver al principio del artículo Volver al principio

8. Para saber más…

Acerca de la obra de Aukanaw.
http://www.geocities.com/
aukanawel/ruka/chillka/acercade.html

Autoridad Binacional Autónoma del Lago Titicaca.
http://www.pnud.bo/
biodiversidadtdps/alt/estudios.html

Aves amenazadas. Birdlife del Perú.
http://www.conam.gob.pe/endb/
docs/base/fauna/avesamenaz.htm
#def%20EN%20PELIGRO

Aves del Perú – Lista de especies en peligro.
http://www.conam.gob.pe/
endb/docs/base/fauna/aves.htm

Avifauna de la puna.
http://www.unesco.org.uy/
mab/documentospdf/puna6.pdf

Coricancha o Templo del Sol.
http://www.antropologia.com.ar/
peru/corican2.htm

Donde nace la piedra.
http://www.cbc.org.pe/
rao/dondelapiedra2.htm

Las aves de la Ría de Noia – Pito Real.
http://www.riadenoia.com/
pito.htm

Las visitas del hombre blanco a la América Precolombina.
http://www.fabiozerpa.com/
ElQuintoHombre/enero02/
Neoantrop_11.htm

Machu Picchu, la historia no conocida.
http://www.unitru.edu.pe/arq/
machu.html

Plantas medicinales empleadas por los mapuche.
http://www.plantasmedicinales.org/
etno/etno8.htm

El Machu Picchu que Bingham “Halló”
http://www.caretas.com.pe/
2001/1680/articulos/machupicchu.phtml

Flora de la Cuenca de Santiago (Chile)
http://mazinger.sisib.uchile.cl/repositorio/lb/
ciencias_quimicas_y_farmaceuticas/navasl01/

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

9. ¿Sabía Usted que…

… La variedad Colaptes rupícola identificada y nombrada científicamente por el naturalista francés Alcides D’Orbigny en 1840, quien la diferenció de su pariente más cercano, el Colaptes pitius. Cabe resaltar que le puso el término “rupícola” por su costumbre de anidar en las rocas. Este pájaro carpintero es pues un ave rupestre, de allí el nombre.

“La diversidad Ornitológica del Perú es la más grande conocida en el mundo. Se han reportado más de 1,700 especies para el país (O’Neill, 1992), distribuidas en 587 géneros, 88 familias y 20 órdenes.”

…Según el Programa Nacional de Diversidad Biológica del CONAM (Perú), en este país habitan unas 111 especies endémicas de aves consideradas en peligro de extinción, de las cuales unas 6 no poseen distribución en los Andes.

…El pájaro carpintero pertenece a la Familia Pícidae del orden de los Piciformes, de la que se conocen más de 212 especies distribuidas por todo el mundo, salvo en Oceanía.

…El padre Jorge Lira se llevó el secreto de la Jotcha a la tumba. Hasta ahora nadie ha logrado identificar tan extraña planta, y muchos especialistas aventuran especulaciones, incluso se ha llegado a sospechar de la Ephedra andina.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10. Epílogo: Dos puntos de vista

10.1. ¿Prefabricaban los incas sus construcciones?

“¿Cómo conseguían los incas que gigantescos bloques de piedra, de formas diferentes, encajaran en sus ciclópeos muros con una precisión absoluta? Intentamos dar luz a este misterio.”

Por: Cristobal Boada
Revista Enigmas (Barcelona) núm. 64
Publicado el 01/02/2002

“Cada uno de estos muros ha sido construido y montado por una sola persona -de estatura y peso normal-, en tan sólo entre una y tres semanas, sin ayuda de ningún otro elemento mecánico moderno más que una hormigonera. Asimismo, para mover y encajar a la perfección estos enormes bloques -cuyo peso, en algunos casos, ronda la tonelada- se han utilizado exclusivamente una palanca y una palanqueta. Esto, que parece casi imposible, no lo es, aunque, eso sí, tiene truco. Quizá el mismo que empleara la civilización lnca en su momento para construir, de forma rápida y precisa, gran cantidad de muros formados por piedras irregulares que encajan entre sí a la perfección, con el personal mínimo y el mínimo esfuerzos, sin embargo, es un sistema tan sencillo que cada uno lo puede reproducir en su propia casa.

Hace ya algún tiempo, en el contexto del amplio reportaje de lker Jiménez Elizari titulado El último secreto de los incas (ver ENIGMAS año VI, Núm. 8), Fernando Jiménez del Oso nos daba una solución a ese problema que tantos quebraderos de cabeza ha causado a los estudiosos de esta cultura, en un recuadro titulado El secreto de los muros Incas. Según él, el sistema que utilizaron los incas para simplificar la construcción de sus muros consiste en “hacer el labrado y el ajuste, no verticalmente, sino horizontalmente y sobre rodillos”. Esta solución, que en principio parece tan sencilla pero que nunca se le había ocurrido a nadie, ya había sido expuesta antes por el doctor, en 1988, en la serie “El Imperio del Sol” sobre las culturas andinas.ón absoluta? Intentamos dar luz a este misterio…

El hecho de que emplearan rodillos era algo nuevo para mí. Pero, tal vez ahí esté la clave, porque -aunque por otros medios- también yo había llegado a la conclusión de que los incas “prefabricaban” sus muros en horizontal.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.1.1. La hipótesis de la “Piedra Blanda”

En primer lugar, partí de la idea preconcebida de que los incas ‘reblandecían’ las piedras de algún modo, si no en su totalidad, sí por lo menos superficialmente. Las marcas dejadas -como de arañazos sobre el jabón blando o sobre masa de pan- en la cara vista de muchas de las piedras que componen las imponentes fortalezas de Sacsahuamán y Ollantaytambo, inducen a pensar en algún método químico o térmico imprecisable, o una combinación de ambos, si es que no se sirvieron de sistemas aún más sofisticados.

En Sacsahuamán, por ejemplo, observé en una piedra que estaba algo separada de su vecina inmediata por el paso del tiempo (y seguramente también por los terremotos) cómo el perfecto encaje se extendía, no sólo por sus bordes más externos, sino en to- da la profundidad de¡ muro. Además, si en una cara lateral presentaba una suave protuberancia, en la piedra contigua se observaba un suave hueco que le complementaba a la perfección y permitía el ajuste a la décima de milímetro. Esto descartaba el uso de una sierra o algo cortante para producir tal separación. El perfecto encaje entre ambas piedras, a pesar de las suaves ondulaciones, sólo se podría conseguir con rapidez si las piedras hubiesen sido ablandadas previamente por algún desconocido método y, entre piedra y piedra, a modo de separación, se hubiese insertado una delgada lámina metálica.

Inevitablemente, cualquier abolladura de dicha lámina metálica habría quedado reflejada en las piedras a ambos lados. Una vez endurecidas éstas, esa lámina se retiraría dejando un hueco mínimo, de sólo unas décimas de milímetro.

No obstante, a pesar de todos estos indicios, no está demostrado en absoluto que los incas dispusieran realmente de un método que les permitiese reblandecer las piedras. Aun así, he partido de ese postulado para hacer mis experimentos y, como sucedáneo moderno de esa hipotética ‘piedra blanda” de los Incas, he usado hormigón y mortero de ‘Portland’, convenientemente coloreados. Pero, incluso aceptando esa hipótesis de la ‘piedra blanda’, tampoco sirve de nada si no tenemos más información, en particular a lo referente sobre las recortadas formas de las piedras.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.1.2. El “imposible” contorno de las piedras

A principios de 1992, observando las fotos de mi primer viaje a Perú y comparando la construcción de los muros incas con los muros tradicionales al estilo romano, me percaté de un detalle: los muros al estilo romano se inician por la base, y las piedras superiores se adaptan a la forma dejada por las piedras inferiores, en sentido ascendente, hasta llegar a la altura deseada, donde se nivela y enrasa. En cambio, en los muros incas es totalmente al revés; el muro se inicia a la altura deseada y las piedras inferiores se tienen que adaptar a la forma dejada por las piedras superiores, en sentido descendente, hasta llegar al suelo o cerca de él. Por así decir, es como si “se empezase la casa por el tejado”. Más del 95% de las piedras se adaptan a este patrón.

Lógicamente debía haber una explicación sencilla y, después de descartar múltiples posibilidades, llegué a la conclusión de que los muros se prefabricaban en el suelo, en horizontal. Como es obvio, en esta posición se puede empezar a construir por cualquier lado que se desee, y si lo hacían por la parte alta del muro era, seguramente, con una finalidad antisísmica.

Pronto me di cuenta de que así, en horizontal, la cara vista quedaría mirando al cielo y, con la idea de la ‘piedra blanda’ en mente, la forma ‘almohadillada’ de las piedras tendería a salir sola, de forma espontánea. Igualmente, también me di cuenta de que así las separaciones entre piedra y piedra quedan todas siempre en vertical, con lo que se puede insertar fácilmente una delgada lámina metálica a modo de separación. Además, no hace falta doblar esas láminas metálicas en rebuscadas y enrevesadas formas zigzagueantes para conseguir reproducir los re- cortados diseños de las piedras incas, sino que bas- ta doblar las tiras de lámina metálica en forma de ‘J’, de “U’ o de ‘V’, en diferentes tamaños y modelos y complementados con tramos rectos, para imitar fielmente cualquier ejemplar de piedra al estilo inca que se pueda imaginar, incluida por supuesto la de “los 12 ángulos”.

Como puede verse todas las formas son muy simples, y todas las planchas son reversibles y reutilizables para sucesivos tramos del mismo muro o de otros muros.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.1.3. Cómo prefabricaban los bloques

De la teoría pasé a la práctica. El objetivo buscado era reproducir las construcciones lo más fielmente posible, con los mismos limitados medios de la época inca. Como sucedáneo moderno de las hipotéticas láminas metálicas -quizá de oro- utilizadas por aquella cultura, he utilizado para mis experimentos plancha de hierro galvanizada de 0,5 milímetros de grosor, cortada a tiras.

Así pues, la anchura de la tira de plancha (siempre la misma anchura para un mismo muro) es la que determinará posteriormente el grosor del muro; y la longitud de la plancha y la forma del doblez (combinada con otras planchas), es la que determina el tamaño de cada piedra y el contorno de las mismas.

Una vez hecho el “prediseño” de las formas de los bloques, y teniendo en cuenta también la posterior inclinación del muro, se procede ya al montaje de las diferentes tiras de plancha, dobladas previamente en la forma deseada. Esto se hace en vertical apoyando y/o hundiendo ligeramente el canto longitudinal inferior de cada una de ellas en el suelo, y a continuación, se hace servir la misma tierra del fondo de cada hueco para apoyar o reforzar las planchas a lado y lado, evitando así que se muevan al hacer el llenado de hormigón (con esta operación se consigue, además, que la parte trasera de muro quede también con las piedras de forma abombada).

Después de llenar los huecos hasta el borde de las planchas, la forma “almohadillado” sale efectivamente sin ningún esfuerzo, al igual que los rebordes que aparecen espontáneamente alrededor de algunas piedras. Y aquí, precisamente, es donde empieza la tanda de descubrimientos “sobre la marcha”.

Para darle un acabado con una textura símil-piedra, basta cubrir cada “almohadilla” con una delgada capa de tierra seca y los terrones de la misma tierra, al hundirlos sobre el hormigón blando, imitan perfectamente los huecos naturales de la piedra. Al cabo de un par de días, una vez ya fraguado el hormigón, se limpia la tierra y los terrones con un chorro de agua a presión.

De esta forma se puede imitar la textura de la piedra con sus huecos, grietas y vetas dándole un realismo impresionante. Por ejemplo: la veta que atraviesa en diagonal la gran piedra central en una de las fotos, no es más que la unión de la hormigonada de un día con la del día siguiente. Al cabo de una semana ya se puede desmontar el muro y retirar las planchas. Para eliminar el brillo artificial dejado por las planchas metálicas, quizá los incas no habían tenido más remedio que “repiquetear” con algo muy duro todos los lados de cada una de las piedras, lo justo para hacerlas ásperas pero sin quitarles grosor.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.1.4. La construcción del muro

Preparados ya todos los bloques, puede empezarse el montaje del muro en su posición y emplazamiento definitivos. Pero aquí es, sin duda, donde se plantea el principal problema: conseguir encajar el muro con el suelo. Para ello hay que hacer una base de elaboración más tosca y con piedras no necesariamente tan pulidas, que permita alinear y nivelarla primera hilera de bloques prefabricados del muro. Hasta hoy, este detalle se había interpretado como que los incas construían sus muros aprovechando edificaciones ya existentes de culturas anteriores. ¡En realidad podría tratarse de una fase más del mismo muro en su proceso de montaje!

Una vez conseguido el alineado y nivelación de la primera hilera de bloques de piedra, el resto del muro encaja a la perfección. No hace falta probar los diferentes bloques ni una sola vez, porque, por su ejecución, ya se sabe de antemano que encajan a la décima de milímetro. Aun así, cuando alrededor de una piedra de gran tamaño coinciden varias más pequeñas, la suma de los grosores de las interseparaciones pueden llegara producir un desfase de 1’5 mm, que no es mucho, evidentemente, pero sí lo suficiente corno para descompensar el resto del muro que va encima. Quizá la mejor forma de evitar ese desfase es hacer los muros con piedras de gran tamaño (cuanto más grandes, menos separaciones y, en consecuencia, también menos desfase). Pero leyendo la obra de los cronistas de la época de la colonización, encontramos otra posible solución para corregir ese desfase: los incas -en ocasiones puntuales- aplicaban entre piedra y piedra una fina capa de arcilla. Aparentemente esa fina capa serviría sólo para evitar el roce y mejorar el efecto asísmico del muro, pero también podría tener la doble función de llenar el hueco dejado por las planchas de separación. Éste es el modo que tenían los incas de prefabricar un muro recto, pero ¿y los muros curvos?, ¿y las esquinas?, ¿y los portales en forma trapezoidal?, ¿y las piedras de gran tamaño? Si para hacer un muro recto es necesario prefabricarlo en horizontal sobre un suelo plano, evidentemente para hacer un muro curvo hay que prefabricarlo sobre un suelo abombado o en forma de montañita. Para hacer una esquina simplemente hay que levantar los dos extremos de dos secciones de un muro hasta formar un ángulo de 45º con el suelo y llenar la separación redondeándola (en posición horizontal, una esquina redondea da también sale sola y sin esfuerzo). Para reproducir un portal, ventana o nicho de forma trapezoidal sólo es necesaria una sencilla labor de encofrado en dos fases. Y, finalmente, el secreto de las piedras de gran tamaño (y aquí está la última parte del ‘truco’) consiste en dejar la piedra hueca por debajo cuando se prefabrica, con lo que se aligera enormemente su peso para su posterior manipulación, y una vez ya montada en el muro, en su posición definitiva, se encofra por detrás y se llena. El resultado final es como la materialización de una metáfora: una sola persona, vulgar y corriente, sin más ayuda que una palanqueta y en muy poco tiempo, es capaz de hacer, mover, colocar y encajar a la décima de milímetro un enorme bloque que puede sobrepasar la tonelada. Si hubiese contado con la ayuda de sólo un par de personas más o de una grúa, con este método habría podido hacer incluso piedras el doble de grandes y pesadas.

Como un reblandecimiento y posterior solidificación de la piedra dejaría -pienso- huellas en su composición, quizá la mejor forma para salir de dudas seria realizar un análisis paleomagnético a todas y cada una de las piedras de un grupo compacto de 4 ó 5 por su cara vista. Con esta operación se podrían averiguar varias cosas: si las catas tuvieran una orientación paleomagnética en su parte más externa diferente de su parte más profunda o interna, podría significar que en algún momento de la manipulación de las piedras éstas se reblandecieron superficialmente de alguna forma; y si la orientación más externa tuviera en todas ellas en la misma dirección significaría que ya estaban juntas en el momento de reblandecerse. También se sabría si se endurecieron en horizontal. Por el contrario, si las catas mostraran una misma orientación paleomagnética en toda su profundidad y esta orientación, a su vez, fuese dispar entre las diferentes piedras, habría que abandonar definitivamente la idea de la ‘piedra blanda’.

Pero, por otra parte, si finalmente se demostrase que los incas sí disponían de algún método para reblandecer la roca, habría que plantearse otras preguntas, como la del transporte de las piedras que componen los muros. Para mí este es un misterio tan grande, o más, que la construcción del propio muro; porque no me convence la versión oficial tradicional que asegura que las grandes piedras eran llevadas rodando o a rastras desde su cantera de origen sólo a base del esfuerzo humano, atravesando la irregular orografía del terreno, a más de 3.000 metros de altura en muchas ocasiones, hasta su destino final en el muro en construcción. Y luego… ¡vuelta a empezar! Y así bloque tras bloque.

Pero si descartamos esta forma de transporte ¿qué otra más nos queda? Es evidente que todavía falta mucho por descubrir. ¿Sabremos algún día toda la verdad? El enigma persiste.”

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.2. Las piedras incas pierden su misterio

“El arquitecto estadounidense Jean Pierre Protzen reprodujo todo su proceso de construcción.”

“Una investigación demostró que extraer, transportar, cortar y ajustar grandes piedras para construir edificios estaba dentro de las posibilidades de los incas.”

Norián Muñoz
Publicado en el diario El Universal de Caracas — martes 18 de febrero de 1997.

“Caracas. Una de las preguntas que ha provocado más especulaciones a lo largo de la historia es ¿cómo los incas lograron extraer bloques de piedra monumentales, debastarlos y unirlos de tal modo que ni una hojilla cabe entre ellos? La respuesta a esta pregunta la encontró en una cantera peruana Jean Pierre Protzen, profesor de arquitectura de la Universidad de California, Estados Unidos, quien vino recientemente a nuestro país invitado por el Doctorado de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Urbanismo de la Universidad Central de Venezuela.

Protzen logró reproducir en el sitio todo el proceso de construcción que comenzaba en la cantera y terminaba con la elaboración de las imponentes paredes. Así pudo demostrar que todo pudo ser hecho perfectamente con la tecnología inca, gracias a una manera muy especial de debastar las piedras y hacerlas encajar unas con otras, aun sin contar con herramientas de hierro.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.2.1. “El loco de la cantera”

El arquitecto explica en un fluío español aprendido en Perú, que todo comenzó en 1979 luego de dictar algunos cursos en la Universidad de Sao Paulo en Brasil. Antes de regresar a Estados Unidos, decidió visitar algunos sitios que le atraían de América Latina, entre ellos Machu Picchu. Se quedó impresionado con la habilidad constructiva de los incas, pero nadie tenía una explicación coherente acerca de cómo se habían hecho estas edificaciones. Entre los argumentos de sus guías se encontraba incluso la intervención de fuerzas extraterrestres.

De regreso a Estados Unidos, Protzen encontró muy poca información sobre estas edificaciones. Decidió entonces investigar por cuenta propia, se fue a Perú en 1982 durante su año sabático y logró que la universidad financiara su proyecto. Durante los primeros días en Perú, no tenía idea de por dónde comenzar, lo único que hacía era observar. Poco a poco se dio cuenta de que tenía que encontrar respuesta a cuatro aspectos fundamentales: cómo extraían la piedra, cómo hacían bloques individuales, cómo la ajustaban y cómo la transportaban.

Muy pocos habitantes de Ollantaytambo, localidad donde se radicó, sabían dónde estaban las canteras. Contrario a lo que esperaba, tampoco se conservó la tradición de extraer la roca y tallarla a la manera inca, de forma que nadie sabía cuál era el tratamiento.

Le tocó entonces experimentar y pasar largos días tallando piedras. Fue un proceso de ensayo y error, hasta que encontró la técnica correcta, que consistía en debastar la piedra poco a poco usando otra piedra de río como martillo. Mientras hacía sus experimentos los lugareños lo llamaban ‘el loco de la cantera’. Para demostrar cómo debía ser el transporte de los bloques de piedra, Protzen involucró a todo el pueblo, que se prestó para trasladar una enorme piedra hasta el lugar donde hoy se encuentran las ruinas. Todas las partes del proceso fueron reproducidas. Para tratar de exponerlo de forma sencilla Protzen explica: ‘en la cantera se labraba la piedra mínimamente. Desde allí era arrastrada con cuerdas a través de los caminos hechos por los propios incas hasta la obras. Una vez en el sitio de la construcción comenzaban a elaborar el muro haciendo una primera hilera de bloques y dejando la parte superior sin cortar.

Luego cortaban las piedras que irían arriba de manera que ‘encajaran’ perfectamente con las anteriores y así sucesivamente. Esto es lo que permite que no sean necesarios otros elementos para unir una piedra con otra’.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.2.2. Imperio récord

Uno de los aspectos más enigmáticos de todo este proceso siempre ha sido el transporte de la piedra. En Ollantaytambo, Protzen comprobó que para movilizar de la cantera a la construcción una piedra de las más largas (de 100 toneladas) se necesitaban unas 1.800 personas que ‘parece mucho, pero no lo es, especialmente si se compara con los dibujos que se encuentran en las tumbas egipcias y los templos asirios donde se ilustraban escenas de transporte similares’. Para cubrir este trayecto, que abarcaba unos 8 kilómetros se empleaban tres días.

Esto deja al descubierto algo asombroso: el imperio duró menos de un siglo y en ese tiempo récord se logró todo el desarrollo que conocemos.

Vale la pena destacar que la cultura Inca no alcanzó su esplendor hasta más o menos cien años antes de la Conquista española en 1532. Durante poco menos de un siglo la sociedad inca pasó de ser un pequeño estado agrícola del centro de Perú a convertirse en un poderoso imperio que se extendía de Chile hasta Ecuador. La base de su florecimiento cultural fue su ambicioso programa de construcciones iniciadas por Pachacútec, el noveno inca, en 1438. Templos, palacios almacenes y cisterna comenzaron a florecer por todas partes.

Aunque esta no era la base de su investigación, Protzen explica que también quedó claro que los incas poseían algún tipo de conocimientos matemáticos o por lo menos geométricos, aunque no ha averiguado cuál ‘cuando se investiga Ollantaytambo, uno nota que las manzanas están esparcidas en porciones iguales y exactamente paralelas’.

También le impresionó el efecto de claroscuro que ofrecen las paredes bajo el sol, pues se pensaba que esta era una simple idea estética y no es otra cosa que la consecuencia de la técnica empleada.

Sobre la cultura Inca había muchos documentos, sólo que con los escasos conocimientos que se tenían era imposible entenderlos. Las respuestas que arrojó la investigación completaron algunas las piezas que faltaban en el rompecabezas.

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

10.2.3. Armonía natural

Al preguntarle al arquitecto cómo se pueden aprovechar estos conocimientos en la actualidad, explica que queda claro que esta técnica no puede emplearse nuevamente. Lo que sí considera importante en la arquitectura inca es su adaptación y el aprovechamiento del medio ambiente ‘en los incas se aporvecha la topografía natural. El medio no era un obstáculo, sino que lo usaban para sus propósitos’.

Este aprovechamiento del medio además permitió que tuvieran cultivos que difícilmente se dan en regiones tan altas, como el maíz y el ají.

En estos momentos Protzen se encuentra haciendo una investigación similar en las ruinas de Tiahuanaco en Bolivia, asiento de una civilización que vivió 600 a 700 años antes de la Inca. Se pensaba que estos habían enseñado las técnicas constructivas a los incas. Pero él ha descubierto que se trata de un tipo de construcción completamente diferente, especialmente en el tratamiento de la piedra y el encaje. Los primeros resultados se publicarán en los próximos meses.”

Volver al principio del apartado             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

11. Notas

(NOTA 1) Cuenta Karen Muller, hija del notable antropólogo chileno Oreste Plath, que su padre, en su texto, escribió el nombre de la Kechuca en su versión quechua, Quechuca. Al parecer la primera definición es voz aimara. (2)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 2) Obsérvese como el nombre de este pájaro, el Jakkacllopito es una acepción que termina en el silábico “pito”. Definición harto sospechosa, habida en cuenta que entre las tradiciones que se escuchan entre los habitantes de las punas andinas está la de la hierba del Pito, que también es mencionada con este nombre por Diego de Rosales cuando dice “que esta planta, pequeña de tamaño y que crece pegada al suelo, recibe su nombre de un pajarito que los mapuche llaman Pito porque come la planta…” Al respecto, Plath coincide con el padre Rosales cuando alude en su libro a esta planta llamada Pito, que da nombre al pájaro que se la come… o se lleva sus ramas para fabricar su nido.

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 3) Hay autores que no están tan seguros de que la esquiva plantita que ablanda la piedra sea efectivamente la Ephedra andina, aunque esta última también tiene sus cualidades peculiares.

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 4) La llamada Eco Región puna es una zona geográfica montañosa que se estira a través de la Cordillera de los Andes, desde el paso de Porculla, al norte peruano, hasta el sur del continente sudamericano. Este “piso” ecológico está conformado por llanuras y planicies desperdigadas entre las cordilleras altas, a una altitud promedio entre 3,400 y 4,500 metros sobre el nivel del mar. Su clima es extremadamente seco, con bruscas variaciones de temperatura que hacen una gran diferencia entre el día y la noche –puede sentirse un sol quemante y luego un frío glacial en cuestión de horas—. Geológicamente se trata de una región Andosólica, con muchos volcanes al sur y terreno muy rocoso. A través de las punas discurren numerosos ríos de suave pendiente, fruto de los deshielos de los nevados. En estas alturas se han contabilizado unos 12.000 lagos y glaciares sobre los 5.000 metros. La puna posee una flora muy rica distribuida en las siguientes áreas según la altitud: Centro y Sur: hierbas pulviniformes, arrosetadas, gramíneas en manojos (ichu), tubera Distichia, quinuales, rodales, tolares. En la Jalca (al Norte de 8º Latitud Sur): pajonal microtérmico. Por su parte, la fauna está es de origen andino-patagónico y está constituida por infinidad de especies, desde insectos hasta mamíferos y aves. (18)

Volver al párrafo             Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 5) Como una confirmación de lo mencionado arriba, sobre las curiosas costumbres de este pájaro carpintero, también observado infinidad de veces por exploradores, científicos y personas comunes que afirman haber visto al Pito excavar sus nidos en los oquedales y paredes rocosas con la ayuda de una extraña hierba desconocida, Jeremy Flanagan, de ProAvesPerú, señaló en un correo electrónico que el representante de la familia de las Picidae en el Perú es el Colaptes rupícola, “el Andean Flicker o como dicen el Carpintero Andino, que hace sus nidos mayormente en huecos entre las piedras y peñas”. Extraña, sin embargo, la omisión de la denominación Pito en la lista de nombres comunes para el Colaptes rupícola en el cuadro sinóptico de Agualtiplano Net (ver subcapítulo 4.2.), lo cual no significa que no se le conozca con ese nombre, muy corriente en la sierra peruana.

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 6) Este río (19), uno de los más importantes de la selva peruana, se forma de la confluencia de los ríos Chanchamayo y Paucartambo, en Junín. La naciente del río Chanchamayo se encuentra en los deshielos de la Cordillera de Huaytapallana, al Este de Huancayo, con el nombre de río Tulumayo. A las orillas de este río se encuentra situada la ciudad de La Merced. El río Paucartambo tiene su origen en el flanco oriental del Nudo de Pasco, debido a los deshielos de la Cordillera de Huachón, en Pasco. El principal afluente del Perené es el Pangoa llamado aguas arriba, Río Satipo. Antes de su confluencia con el Ene, el Perené atraviesa el amplio valle de Selva Alta de Chanchamayo, considerado como el principal centro cafetalero y frutícola del oriente peruano.

Figura 32.jpg (28571 bytes)

Figura 32. En este mapa turístico de la provincia de Satipo (Junín) se puede apreciar la cuenca del río Perené y su confluencia con el río Ene para formar el Tambo. Ésta es la región de la que habla el libro Exploration Fawcett, donde habría sido vista la misteriosa planta. Se trata de unas selvas impenetrables aún poco exploradas y que son consideradas en Perú como área ecológica protegida.

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 7) Información obtenida de:
http://www.chlorischile.cl/Linares/
ephedraceae.htm

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(NOTA 8) Plaza & Janes Editores. Séptima Edición. 1977

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

12. FUENTES

(Nota: A la derecha de los hipervínculos se ha insertado la fecha de última apertura de la página Web citada)

(1) The Ancient Walls.
http://home.earthlink.net/
~rnisbet/frame8.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(2) Los ablandadores de piedras.
http://www.mundomisterioso.com/
article.php?sid=1177
(10/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(3) Sacsayhuaman, A Photo Gallery”
http://www.geocities.com/
jqjacobs/saxsayhuaman.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(4) Web site de Machu Picchu (Cusco)
http://www.machupicchuonline.com/ (13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(5) Mapa del Estado Mapuche.
http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/
documentos/graficos/mapas/mapupol1.h tm
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(6) Acerca del Pueblo Mapuche: Su Historia y Organización Social.
http://www.uchile.cl/cultura/mapa/
artesamapuche/historia.htm
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(7) Zoología Mapuche. El Enigma del Pájaro Pitiwe y la hierba que disuelve el hierro y la piedra.
http://www.geocities.com/auka_mapu/
documentos/ornito/pitiwe.htm
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principiov

(8) La Ciencia Secreta de los Mapuche: Biografía de Aukanaw.
http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/obras/
cienciasecreta/introduccion/introciencia.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(9) Zoología Mapuche. Índice de especies y Sinonimia por Orden Numérico 169 – 287.
http://www.geocities.com/
auka_mapu/documentos/
cataloguskullin/numerico/5.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(10) Página Web de Oreste Plath.
http://www.uchile.cl/cultura/oplath/ (13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(11) Museo Arqueológico de Cochabamba (Bolivia)
http://www.umss.edu.bo/Sitios/Museo/
rapida_mirada/arqueologia.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(12) Waterstone of the Wild.
http://www.spirasolaris.ca/waterstone.html (13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(13) Unusual Andean Stoneworking.
http://home.earthlink.net/~rnisbet/
huacas1.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(13a) Decreto Supremo Nº 013-99-AG sobre especies de fauna silvestre en vías de extinción (Documento PDF)
http://www.inrena.gob.pe/
fauna/ds-013.pdf
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(14) Tiahuanaco: Pueblo de los Hijos del Sol.
http://www.geocities.com/
Area51/3184/tiahua.htm
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(15) La Estela de Famine.
http://www.piramidologia.com/
articulos/3/3.html
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(16) Colaptes Rupícola.
http://www.agualtiplano.net/bases/
animales/57_prin.htm#manejo
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(17) Marcos Jiménez de la Espada.
http://www.csic.es/cbic/BGH/
espada/biblio.htm
(13/05/2003)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(18) Mapa del Perú – Región puna.
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/botany/
projects/cpd/sa/map69.htm
(16/05/03)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

(19) El río Perené.
http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/
Vines/6274/afluente.htm
(29/05/03)

Volver al párrafo            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

13. Lista de Imágenes

Fig. 1. Coricancha o Templo del Sol.
http://www.antropologia.com.ar/
peru/corican2.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 1a. Muro inca en una calle cusqueña.
http://www.stijnvandenhoven.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/cyclo-2a.jpg

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 1b. Sacsayhuaman.
http://www.stijnvandenhoven.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/sacsay1m.jpg

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 2. Típica familia mapuche del sur de la Patagonia (Fines del S. XIX)
http://www.geocities.com/aukanawel/
documentos/galeria/adentunchillka/image11.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 2a. Alegoría mapuche de un pájaro Pitiwe.
http://www.geocities.com/auka_mapu/
documentos/ornito/pitiwe.htm
7

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 3. El padre Diego de Rosales.
http://icarito.tercera.cl/biografias/
1600-1810/bios/rosales.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 4. La puna en Puno.
http://hot.ee/esi/peruu2.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 5. Mapa del Perú – Región puna.
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/botany/
projects/cpd/sa/map69.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 6. Portada del libro de Percy H. Fawcett-Brian Fawcett.
http://hallamericanhistory.com/
index.php/Mode/product/
AsinSearch/1842124684/name/
Exploration%2520Fawcett.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 7. Un “asiento” muy alto…
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/huacas1.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 8. ¿Huaca? ¿Altar? ¿Templo?
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/huacas3.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 9. Escaleras ¿a dónde?
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/huacas2.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principiov

Fig. 10. Silla “in memoriam”
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/seat.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 11a.-11b. “Banco”
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/tmbench.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 12. ¿Templo lunar?
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/three.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 13. Monolitos de Ollantaytambo.
http://home.earthlink.net/
%7Ernisbet/otshrin.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 14. Colaptes rupícola.
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/
vert/birds/flicker.jpg

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 15. Colaptes pitius.
http://www.viarural.com.ar/viarural.com.ar/
servicios/turismorural/san-roberto/
fauna-ars/picidae/carpintero-pitio.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 16. Cuadro sinóptico del Colaptes rupícola.
http://www.agualtiplano.net/
bases/animales/manejo

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 17. Ephedra andina.
http://www.hanfmedien.com/
hanf/gfx/0106/42a.jpg

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 18. Croquis descriptivo de la Ephedra Andina.
http://mazinger.sisib.uchile.cl/repositorio/lb/
ciencias_quimicas_y_farmaceuticas/
navasl01/cap3/pages/03.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 19. Una puerta a la nada…
http://www.crystalinks.com/
tiahuanaco.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 20. Mapa que señala la ubicación de Tiahuanaco al sur del lago Titicaca.
http://www.crystalinks.com/
tiahuanaco.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 21. El templo semi-subterráneo de Tiahuanaco.
http://www.crystalinks.com/
tiahuanaco.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 22. Homenaje a Thor Heyerdahl.
http://www.playasperu.com/
articulos/Heyerdahl.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 23. La Kon Tiki Zarpa del Callao (|947)
http://www.playasperu.com/
articulos/Heyerdahl.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 24. El dios Kon Tiki
http://www.playasperu.com/
articulos/Heyerdahl.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 25. Arthur Posnaksky.
http://www.south-american-pic.com/
feat4/atlantis.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 26. Muros y grandes bloques pétreos tirados por el suelo.
http://www.crystalinks.com/
preinca2.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 27. Una estatua de impenetrable mirada.
http://home.t-online.de/home/
w.trumpfheller/bo19.htm

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 28. La célebre Puerta del Sol.
http://www.crystalinks.com/
preinca2.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 29. Plano de Tiahuanaco.
http://www.crystalinks.com/
preinca2.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 30. La Estela de Famine.
http://www.piramidologia.com/
articulos/3/3.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 31. Extraña impresión de un objeto sobre una piedra “ablandada”
http://www.piramidologia.com/
articulos/3/3.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio

Fig. 32. Mapa turístico de la provincia de Satipo (Perú) con la ubicación del río Peremé.
http://satipo.20m.com/Location.html

Volver a la imagen            Volver al principio del artículo             Volver al principio
linea.gif (922 bytes)
Vivat Academia, revista del “Grupo de Reflexión de la Universidad de Alcalá” (GRUA).
REDACCIÓN
Tus preguntas y comentarios sobre este Web dirígelos a vivatacademia@uah.es
Copyright © 1999 Vivat Academia. ISSN: 1575-2844.  Números anteriores. Año V.
Última modificación: 24-06-2003

Leyden Jar

S

The Leyden jar originated about 1746 through the work of Dutch physicist Pieter van Musschenbroek of the University of Leyden and Ewald Georg von Kleist of Pomerania, working independently.

A Leyden jar consists of a glass jar with an outer and inner metal coating covering the bottom and sides nearly to the neck. A brass rod terminating in an external knob passes through a wooden stopper and is connected to the inner coating by a loose chain. When an electrical charge is applied to the external knob, positive and negative charges accumulate from the two metal coatings respectively, but they are unable to discharge due to the glass between them.  The result is that the charges will hold each other in equilibrium until a discharge path is provided. Leyden jars were first used to store electricity in experiments, and later as a condenser in early wireless equipment.

http://www.sparkmuseum.com/LEYDEN.HTM


12″ Leyden Jar
c. 1885


Early gold leaf Leyden Jars
1st half 19th century


Battery of six Leyden Jars


“Franklin’s Bells”
Late 18th Century


Leyden Jar with
Lane’s Discharging Electrometer
1890

A Lane apparatus is a Leyden Jar fitted with a calibrated spark gap. They were used primarily in medical applications, in order to regulate the amount of voltage applied to the patient.


Demonstration
Leyden Jar

This jar can be separated into three parts: The outer metal can, the glass jar, and the inner metal electrode. It was used to demonstrate that the charge in a Leyden jar is held in the glass, not the metal.


Horizontal Leyden Jar
English
1830


Leyden Jars from Spark Gap Transmitter
c. 1910


Ducretet Leyden Jar Battery
1865


Early American Leyden Jars Likely Daniel Davis
1840’s

Electrical Sportsman
Joseph Wightman
1840’s

Random Info Of Interest

Nicolay Tesla

“If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe.”
-Tesla

As we look at the six original Solfeggio frequencies, using the Pythagorean method, we find the base or root vibrational numbers are 3,6, & 9.

Nikola Tesla tells us, and I quote: “If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe.”

John Keely, an expert in electromagnetic technologies, wrote that:

“Vibrations of “thirds, sixths, and ninths, were extraordinarily powerful.”

vibratory antagonistic thirds was thousands of times more forceful in separating hydrogen from oxygen in water than heat.

In his “Formula of Aqueous Disintegration” he wrote that, “molecular dissociation or disintegration of both simple and compound elements, whether gaseous or solid, a stream of vibratory antagonistic thirds sixths, or ninths, on their chord mass will compel progressive subdivisions.
In the disintegration of water the instrument is set on thirds, sixths, and ninths,
to get the best effects.”

It is through the disturbance of this oscillatory equilibrium, by means of resonant impulses, that Keely alters the relations of the vibratory impulses which constitute matter.

!!! This he does by striking the same chord in three octaves !!!
representing the third, sixth and ninth of the scale.

 

—–
Copper wire
Copper coil makes sound at a frequency depending on the length of
the wire and the thickness of the wire.

—–

Cymatics
reasonant frequency of coils
boiling water with sound
levitating stones with sound, frequency of most common component, quartz,
counteracting the magnetic field of the stone
sacred geometry
Magnetism
Oposing poles repel
Riding the earths magnetic field, flying machines

—–

The strength of a coil’s magnetic field increases not only with increasing current but also with each loop that is added to the coil. A long, straight coil of wire is called a solenoid and can be used to generate a nearly uniform magnetic field similar to that of a bar magnet. The concentrated magnetic field inside a coil is very useful in magnetizing ferromagnetic materials for inspection using the magnetic particle testing method. Please be aware that the field outside the coil is weak and is not suitable for magnetizing ferromagnetic materials.