SER LION

SER APIS  (LION + BULL)

 

Source: http://www.cozychinese.com/lion-shi/

The Lion, in Chinese is called Shi (獅 pinyin: shī) or Shizi , a term which has been advanced to have been derived as a transliteration of the first syllable from some Iranian language, possibly from the  Iranian, Sary, or even the Sanskrit, Sinha. The Persians called Leo Ser or Shir; the Turks, Artan; the Syrians, Aryo; the Jews, Arye; the Indians, Simha, all meaning “lion”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_%28constellation%29

It is generally held that the lion was first known in China during the great period of expansion and commercial penetration into Central Asia under the Former-Han dynasty, 206 B.C.-24 A.D.

The lion, called Shī, is the homonym for the word meaning master, teacher or official and so it has been used in symbolically forming rebuses. In addition, the term Shih is also a homonym for the word meaning generation and used in that capacity.

-By William C. Hu and David Lei

 

Leo the Lion is one of the earliest recognized constellations. The Mesopotamians are known to have documented the “lion” constellation. The Persians called it Ser or Shir; the Turks, Artan; the Syrians, Aryo; the Jewish, Arye; the Indians, Simha. These are all translated as “lion.”

Hunting the lion

Leo is a highly recognizable constellation, as it is one of the few constellations that resemble its namesake. It is fairly easy to find because the “pointer stars” of the Big Dipper point to Leo.

March does come in with a lion. The constellation becomes visible in the Northern Hemisphere around the spring equinox and is easily identifiable through May. Leo lies between Cancer to the west and Virgo to the east.

  • Right ascension: 11 hours
  • Declination: 15 degrees
  • Visible between latitudes 90 and minus 65 degrees
  • Best seen in April at 9 p.m.

This sky chart shows where the constellation Leo, the Lion and its trademark sickle appear in the eastern sky as viewed from the Northern Hemisphere during spring. This chart is where the constellation appears at 8 p.m. EDT as viewed from the U.S. East Coast.

This sky chart shows where the constellation Leo, the Lion and its trademark sickle appear in the eastern sky as viewed from the Northern Hemisphere during spring. This chart is where the constellation appears at 8 p.m. EDT as viewed from the U.S. East Coast.

Credit: Starry Night Software

 

Gilgamesh and a lion cub from the Louvre. (reference to LEO?)SERpens

SERPENS / passing behind Ophiuchus between Mu Serpentis in Serpens Caput and Nu Serpentis in Serpens Cauda. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpens)
SICKLE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sickle

Marduk tiamat (anzu bird,  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anz%C3%BB_%28mythology%29)

Bel and the dragon

 

The constellation can be found by looking for the “SICKLE” (!HARVEST) starting at the Regulus (Alpha Leonis) star. Regulus, Al Jabbah, and Algieba, together with the fainter stars ζ Leo (Adhafera), μ Leo (Ras Elased Borealis), and ε Leo (Ras Elased Australis), constitute the sickle.

Another star in the planet is Al Geiba, the brightest star in the curve of the sickle, means “the lion’s mane.” In January 2001, a large object eight times the size of Jupiter was discovered orbiting Al Geiba.

A triangle of stars forms the lion’s haunches, with the brightest star of this trio being Denebola, which means “tail of the lion.”

 

Mythology

Leo is the Nemean Lion, which was killed by Hercules on one of the 12 labors he had to perform for killing his family. According to Greek mythology, the lion that terrorized the citizens had a hide that could not punctured by iron, bronze or stone. Having broken all of his weapons fighting the man-eating lion, Hercules finally strangled it to death and placed it in the heavens as one of his conquests.

The Hebrew word ser-aphim is not really a name but rather what might be considered a genus, not unlike the word Elohim, the genus God. But whether it actually denotes a specific kind of creature can’t be determined with the sparse data we have on the word seraphim.

What we do know is that the word שרפים (seraphim) is a plural word; single would be שרף (sarap), or Seraph.

The root-verb שרף (sarap) means to burn, and this always in a literal sense. HAW Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament reports that there are up to fifteen words in Hebrew that mean to burn, but sarap is used mostly in the sense of consuming or destructive burning (of a house, Judges 12:1; city, Joshua 6:24; idols, Exodus 32:20; dead people 1 Samuel 31:12; people executed, Joshua 7:25). In the rare cases that this verb is used in a sacrificial way, it still deals with destruction rather than with sacrifice

This could be the combination of a fire breating dragon.

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