Mycenean Sphinxes

Mycenaen Rosette – Rodakas

 

 

The rosette (rodakas in Greek) a motif that was widespread throughout Mesopotamia, Egypt and other ancient civilizations appears as well in many ancient Greek-Mycenaean jewels, among its other decorative uses in architecture and pottery (circa 1500 BC).

Mycenaean rosettes come usually in 6 or 8 or 12 leaves. They were made of gold and were used to decorate cloths for both men and women, sewn directly on them. They were also used in belts or as repeated motifs in necklaces, and as single decorations in earrings and rings.

 

I believe that the mycenean and minoan rosette is another shape for the sun.

We see this also in mediaval churches in form of the rose window.

Statue of Meryetamun, daughter of Ramses II, c. 1250 BC, located in the Cairo Museum.

 

 

J.-C. Poursat, Catalogue des Ivoires Myceniens du Musee National d’Athenes; Les Ivoires Myceniens, Athens, 1997.

https://www.abebooks.com/book-s…/author/poursat-jean-claude/

http://www.vakras.com/sphinx_and_pythia.html

One picture: Heraldically opposed sfinxes, Ivory relief. From the “House of Sfinxes”, Mycenae. Ascribed to c. 1300-1200 BC. Illus. 162, Higgins, Minoan and Mycenaean Art. Pl. 97, Taylour, The Mycenaeans.

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